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Use Ada and win money

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Still time to enter the Make with Ada competion

Got An idea for an embedded project that will be running on an ARM Cortex M or R? Then – if you get your skates on – there is still time to take part in AdaCore’s Make with Ada competition and as well as getting your project completed you could be in for a share of $88,000 prize money.

There are some restrictions: you have to enter as an individual or a team of up to 4 people, you have to use the Ada or SPARK languages and you have to maintain a project log.

You will be judged on how criteria that will measure how inventive, collaborative dependable and open your project is.

You have until September 300th to register at http://makewithada.org/

For inspiration, check out the recent blogs about the candy dispenser, pen plotter and smartwatch hacks from AdaCore, and see some of the competition entries on the Make with Aa website.

For the latest competition updates on Twitter follow @adaprogrammers and use the hashtag #MakewithAda to share your ideas

Declaration of interest –I am one of the judges

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