editor's blog
Subscribe Now

A New Step Forward for 3D Printed Fashion?

3D printed fashion is not new at this point. Printed accessories, jewelery, and even dresses have been showing up at Maker Faires, 3D Printing shows, and other technology/fashion showcases for several years now. Last year, I wrote about some of the 3D printed fashion at the 3D Printing Conference and Expo in New York City and the exciting intersection between art and technology being represented at that show.

This weekend, I feel like I witnessed a sign of a big step forward for 3D printed fashion within culture. I went to the Museum at FIT (at the Fashion Insitute of Technology in New York City) to check out their new Fairy Tale Fashion Exhibition. The show examines how fairy tales inspire high fashion, from red cloaks to glass slippers to gowns fit for a swan princess. It’s an exhibit in keeping with many of the other fashion art museum displays put on by the Museum at FIT, or the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of art, or other museums/galleries of that nature. The focus is not on technology or high tech. 

One display featured garments inspired by the story of Cinderella, including, predictably, several fancy shoes inspired by glass slippers. Among them, I was excited to find a glass slipper by Noritaka Tatehana: a clear acrylic, heel-less high heel, faceted to reflect light. The explantory placard in front of it casually mentioned that it was a 3D printed shoe. I read the card and said to my companion, “whelp, it looks like 3D printed fashion has arrived.”

Fairy-Tale-Fashion-MFIT-Noritaka-Tatehana-250.jpg

The inclusion of a 3D printed item in this exhibit seems to signal a step forward because this is a fashion art show. Not a special “3D Printed Fashion” show or a “Technology in Fashion” display or a “BEHOLD… FASHION OF THE FUTURE!” -type event. The topic is not meant to highlight 3D printing technology at all. The placard doesn’t scream: “Look at this crazy 3D printed shoe! What a wild new technique!” It simply explains that 3D printing was the technique the designer used to achieve the effect he wanted. This matter-of-fact presentation of 3D printing, placed right alongside all the other techniques in an art show, is a signal that 3D printed fashion is taking a step from the sideshow onto the mainstage.

 

Cinderella Slipper and photograph © Noritaka Tatehana, 2014

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 25, 2020
It constantly amazes me how there are always multiple ways of doing things. The problem is that sometimes it'€™s hard to decide which option is best....
Nov 25, 2020
[From the last episode: We looked at what it takes to generate data that can be used to train machine-learning .] We take a break from learning how IoT technology works for one of our occasional posts on how IoT technology is used. In this case, we look at trucking fleet mana...
Nov 25, 2020
It might seem simple, but database units and accuracy directly relate to the artwork generated, and it is possible to misunderstand the artwork format as it relates to the board setup. Thirty years... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community sit...
Nov 23, 2020
Readers of the Samtec blog know we are always talking about next-gen speed. Current channels rates are running at 56 Gbps PAM4. However, system designers are starting to look at 112 Gbps PAM4 data rates. Intuition would say that bleeding edge data rates like 112 Gbps PAM4 onl...

featured video

AI SoC Chats: Protecting Data with Security IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

Understand the threat profiles and security trends for AI SoC applications, including how laws and regulations are changing to protect the private information and data of users. Secure boot, secure debug, and secure communication for neural network engines is critical. Learn how DesignWare Security IP and Hardware Root of Trust can help designers create a secure enclave on the SoC and update software remotely.

Click here for more information about Security IP

featured paper

Simplify your isolated current & voltage sensing designs

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Learn how the latest isolated amplifiers and isolated ADCs can operate with a single supply on the low side, and why this offers substantial benefits over traditional solutions.

Click here to download the whitepaper

Featured Chalk Talk

Evaluation and Development Kits

Sponsored by Samtec

With signal integrity becoming increasingly challenging in today’s designs, interconnect is taking on a key role. In order to see how a particular interconnect solution will perform in our design, we really need hands-on evaluation of the technology. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Matthew Burns of Samtec about evaluation and development kits for high-speed interconnect solutions.

More information about Samtec Evaluation and Development Kits