editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Toyota Unintended Acceleration

The Toyota Unintended Acceleration case has seen a lot of discussion, but much of it is, to put it mildly, not terribly well informed.  Last week at the UK’s High Integrity Software conference (look at the slides here http://his-2015.co.uk/slides )  I heard an authoritative speaker.  Prof. Philip Koopman is regularly asked to act as an expert witness on behalf of people claiming against Toyota, and acted as such in the Bookout/Schwarz trial in 2013 when a jury decided that that defects in Toyota’s Electronic Throttle Control System (ETCS) software and safety architecture caused a fatal mishap. 

As Phil is involved in on-going litigation he has to be very careful in what he says, and his talk is carefully prepared.  He has put the slides, and a video, on his website http://betterembsw.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/a-case-study-of-toyota-unintended.html

If you have a few minutes to spare it is well worth a visit (sa is the rest of his site). If nothing else it will cause you to have severe qualms about the way in which the software was developed and the way in which people can interpret the result of investigations. I think it also raises serious questions about using normal court proceedings to get to the root of technical issues.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 15, 2019
Cadence sponsors several different tech conferences throughout the year. We use these events as an opportunity to allow employees to take a day out of our normal work routine to network, learn, and... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community sit...
Jul 11, 2019
This is the first of a two-part article outlining the restoration of the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC), and Samtec'€™s participation in the process, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing. If you'€™re like me, you'€™re watching and reading about t...
Jan 25, 2019
Let'€™s face it: We'€™re addicted to SRAM. It'€™s big, it'€™s power-hungry, but it'€™s fast. And no matter how much we complain about it, we still use it. Because we don'€™t have anything better in the mainstream yet. We'€™ve looked at attempts to improve conven...