editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Faster NoC Tuning

In a sleepy little town of 4 or 5 houses, you can be pretty informal about how mail arrives at its destinations. People can come pick it up at the post office, or the postmaster can drop it off on the way home, or whatever works. But once you get too many houses, you have to get organized: create routes and schedules and hire delivery folks to handle deliveries in a more structured manner.

That’s what’s happened with SoCs: the ad-hoc interconnect schemes of yore are giving way to networks-on-chip (NoCs) so that the complex communication interplay between blocks can be carefully designed, managed, and tuned.

Which is good, except that a NoC is a complex animal, and, traditionally, it goes into the chip layout mix as part of the whole – it’s just another (complex) bit of IP. Layout affects performance, so tuning and closing the timing of a NoC in the middle of the rest of the layout would presumably be a difficult proposition. It also adds a significant burden to the EDA tools trying to manage the whole thing.

So Arteris has a proposal: segregate the NoC that from the rest of the circuit and optimize it independently. This relies on a layout that provides channels between IP instances where the NoC lines and circuits will be placed.

They describe a three-step process starting after initial layout. First, the NoC IP is isolated so that timing and routing can be optimized. In the second part, pipeline stages are automatically added (as they point out, you’ll never get from point A to point B across a 28-nm chip in one clock cycle). Finally, timing is closed using physical synthesis – which they claim can provide single-pass success.

FlexNoC_drawing.png 

This lets you optimize the NoC unburdened by the rest of the SoC, and it lets the EDA tools handle the rest of the SoC unburdened by the NoC. Arteris says that this divide-and-conquer approach gets you to tape-out faster than trying to do the whole thing at once.

You can read more in their announcement.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 5, 2022
The 30th edition of SMM , the leading international maritime trade fair, is coming soon. The world of shipbuilders, naval architects, offshore experts and maritime suppliers will be gathering in... ...
Jul 5, 2022
By Editorial Team The post Q&A with Luca Amaru, Logic Synthesis Guru and DAC Under-40 Innovators Honoree appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Jun 28, 2022
Watching this video caused me to wander off into the weeds looking at a weird and wonderful collection of wheeled implementations....

featured video

Demo: Achronix Speedster7t 2D NoC vs. Traditional FPGA Routing

Sponsored by Achronix

This demonstration compares an FPGA design utilizing Achronix Speedster7t 2D Network on Chip (NoC) for routing signals with the FPGA device, versus using traditional FPGA routing. The 2D NoC provides a 40% reduction in logic resources required with 40% less compile time needed versus using traditional FPGA routing. Speedster7t FPGAs are optimized for high-bandwidth workloads and eliminate the performance bottlenecks associated with traditional FPGAs.

Subscribe to Achronix's YouTube channel for the latest videos on how to accelerate your data using FPGAs and eFPGA IP

featured paper

3 key considerations for your next-generation HMI design

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Human-Machine Interface (HMI) designs are evolving. Learn about three key design considerations for next-generation HMI and find out how low-cost edge AI, power-efficient processing and advanced display capabilities are paving the way for new human-machine interfaces that are smart, easily deployable, and interactive.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Key Elements of Indoor Air Quality: Why Do They Matter and Why Do We Detect Them?

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Sensirion

Measuring indoor air pollution is a valuable tool to monitor our health and productivity. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton and Timothy Kennedy from Sensirion discuss the what, how, and why of indoor air quality testing and how the all in one air quality sensor called Sen5X from Sensirion can make measuring our indoor air quality easier than ever before.

More information about Sensirion SEN5x Environmental Sensor Nodes