editor's blog
Subscribe Now

AMD Pulls the Plug on SeaMicro

One-third of a billion dollars doesn’t go as far as it used to. AMD acquired SeaMicro in 2012 for $334 million, hoping to jump into the hot (at the time) market for “microservers,” machines that use a lot of small microprocessors instead of just a few big ones. Now, AMD has killed off the entire product line and reassigned the staff.

SeaMicro wasn’t one of the many ARM-based server startups. Instead, it used small x86 processors to make its microservers, an obvious selling point for AMD. Nevertheless, AMD is moving forward with its ARM-based server chips, including the upcoming Opteron A1100. But SeaMicro’s x86 machines never seemed to catch fire, and decided to pull the plug.

The announcement came abruptly, in the midst of the company’s quarterly financial earnings report. There was zero notice, at least to outsiders. The SeaMicro website now has just a single page, with one link to contact tech support. Good luck with that.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Apr 9, 2021
You probably already know what ISO 26262 is. If you don't, then you can find out in several previous posts: "The Safest Train Is One that Never Leaves the Station" History of ISO 26262... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community s...
Apr 8, 2021
We all know the widespread havoc that Covid-19 wreaked in 2020. While the electronics industry in general, and connectors in particular, took an initial hit, the industry rebounded in the second half of 2020 and is rolling into 2021. Travel came to an almost stand-still in 20...
Apr 7, 2021
We explore how EDA tools enable hyper-convergent IC designs, supporting the PPA and yield targets required by advanced 3DICs and SoCs used in AI and HPC. The post Why Hyper-Convergent Chip Designs Call for a New Approach to Circuit Simulation appeared first on From Silicon T...
Apr 5, 2021
Back in November 2019, just a few short months before we all began an enforced… The post Collaboration and innovation thrive on diversity appeared first on Design with Calibre....

featured video

Meeting Cloud Data Bandwidth Requirements with HPC IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

As people continue to work remotely, demands on cloud data centers have never been higher. Chip designers for high-performance computing (HPC) SoCs are looking to new and innovative IP to meet their bandwidth, capacity, and security needs.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Understanding Functional Safety FIT Base Failure Rate Estimates per IEC 62380 and SN 29500

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Functional safety standards such as IEC 61508 and ISO 26262 require semiconductor device manufacturers to address both systematic and random hardware failures. Base failure rates (BFR) quantify the intrinsic reliability of the semiconductor component while operating under normal environmental conditions. Download our white paper which focuses on two widely accepted techniques to estimate the BFR for semiconductor components; estimates per IEC Technical Report 62380 and SN 29500 respectively.

Click here to download the whitepaper

featured chalk talk

Using the Graphical PMSM FOC Component in Harmony3

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Microchip

Developing embedded software, and particularly configuring your embedded system can be a major pain for development engineers. Getting all the drivers, middleware, and libraries you need set up and in the right place and working is a constant source of frustration. In this episode of Chak Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Brett Novak of Microchip about Microchip’s MPLAB Harmony 3, with the MPLAB Harmony Configurator - an embedded development framework with a drag-and-drop GUI that makes configuration a snap.

Click here for more information about Microchip Technology MPLAB® X Integrated Development Environment (IDE)