editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Multicore Microcontrollers for IoT and audio

XMOS has, from its base in Bristol, England, been quietly building up its business of creating a new force in the embedded market. The company has been shipping the xCore multicore microcontrollers into a wide range of companies around the world, and has built a particularly strong position in audio. Last summer it was announced that the company had raised £26.2 million from Robert Bosch Venture Capital, Huawei Technologies, and Xilinx.

Now it is announcing a new generation of  xCORE – xCORE 200, and a product specifically for the high resolution audio market – xCORE-Audio

The xCORE -200 is targeted at the Internet of Things, with Gigabit Ethernet joining USB 2.0 and high performance general IO, improved performance (2000 MIPS in the launch device), and increased memory. A new development , upgraded tool suite and improved libraries. Code written for earlier xCORE products will run on the xCORE-200. Deterministic real-time operations make the family suitable for a wide range of data acquisition, networking, HMI and other applications.

The success that XMOS has in audio provided the impetus for two  families optimised for this field. The xCORE-Audio/ Hi-Res is for consumer audio and video, including stero high resolution headphone amplifiers and the xCORE-Audio/Live addresses prosumer and professional audio, such ads DJ kits, mixing, and conferencing. They both work with a range of operating systems, support a variety of audio formats and interfaces, including USB type C.

DSP support in the xCORE-Audio/ Hi-Res is aimed at applications like surround sound and karaoke while that in the xCORE-Audio/Live is aimed at audio mixing and post-processing pipelines. And the company points out that pricing starts at less than $2.00 in high volume.

An in-depth report on this will follow.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jan 17, 2020
I once met Steve Wozniak, or he once met me (it's hard to remember the nitty-gritty details)....
Jan 17, 2020
[From the last episode: We saw how virtual memory helps resolve the differences between where a compiler thinks things will go in memory and the real memories in a real system.] We'€™ve talked a lot about memory '€“ different kinds of memory, cache memory, heap memory, vi...
Jan 16, 2020
While Samtec started as a connector company with a focus on two-piece, pin-and-socket board stacking systems, High-Speed Board Stacking connectors and High-Speed Cable Assemblies now make up a significant portion of our sales. To support development in this area, in December ...
Jan 16, 2020
Betting on Hydrogen-Powered Cars On-demand DRC within P&R cuts closure time in half for MaxLinear Functional Safety Verification For AV SoC Designs Accelerated With Advanced Tools Automating the pain out of clock domain crossing verification Mentor unpacks LVS and LVL iss...

Featured Video

RedFit IDC SKEDD Connector

Sponsored by Wurth Electronics and Mouser Electronics

Why attach a header connector to your PCB when you really don’t need one? If you’re plugging a ribbon cable into your board, particularly for a limited-use function such as provisioning, diagnostics, or testing, it can be costly and clunky to add a header connector to your BOM, and introduce yet another component to pick and place. Wouldn’t it be great if you could plug directly into your board with no connector required on the PCB side? In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Ben Arden from Wurth Electronics about Redfit, a slick new connector solution that plugs directly into standard via holes on your PCB.

Click here for more information about Wurth Electronics REDFIT IDC SKEDD Connector