editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Freescale Acquired by NXP

Did not see that coming.

American chipmaker Freescale will be acquired by Dutch rival NXP in a cash and stock deal worth about $11.8 billion. The combined firm will have a valuation of about $40B, making it one of the larger semiconductor vendors in the world. Freescale shareholders will receive about one-third of a share of NXP stock and $6.25 in cash for each share of Freescale stock.

The deal gives Freescale an “enterprise value” (the net worth of the company minus its cash in the bank) of $16.7 billion. The purchase price is considerably below that sum because Freescale doesn’t actually have cash in the bank; it’s in debt. So NXP will be acquiring Freescale’s debt in addition to its intrinsic value as a company, a pretty typical arrangement in these situations.

For the historically minded, Freescale was originally called Motorola Semiconductor after it was spun off from parent company Motorola (which is now part of Google). Motorola/Motorola Semi created many of the embedded world’s most popular microprocessors, including 68HC05, 68HC11, and the 68000 family that powered early Sun workstations and Apple’s first Macintoshes. The company had some misses, too, like the 88000 RISC architecture and the “RISC-ified” ColdFire. In recent years, the company had most of its success in automotive and deeply embedded industrial segments. The company got its start almost 100 years ago, making radios for automobiles, hence the name Motorola: motorized Victrola.

For its part, NXP was once Philips Semiconductor, the chip-making arm of the giant Dutch electronics firm, before being spun off in 2006. The acquisition is expected to close in the second half of this year.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 23, 2022
The current challenge in custom/mixed-signal design is to have a fast and silicon-accurate methodology. In this blog series, we are exploring the Custom IC Design Flow and Methodology stages. This methodology directly addresses the primary challenge of predictability in creat...
Nov 22, 2022
Learn how analog and mixed-signal (AMS) verification technology, which we developed as part of DARPA's POSH and ERI programs, emulates analog designs. The post What's Driving the World's First Analog and Mixed-Signal Emulation Technology? appeared first on From Silicon To So...
Nov 21, 2022
By Hossam Sarhan With the growing complexity of system-on-chip designs and technology scaling, multiple power domains are needed to optimize… ...
Nov 18, 2022
This bodacious beauty is better equipped than my car, with 360-degree collision avoidance sensors, party lights, and a backup camera, to name but a few....

featured video

Unique AMS Emulation Technology

Sponsored by Synopsys

Learn about Synopsys' collaboration with DARPA and other partners to develop a one-of-a-kind, high-performance AMS silicon verification capability. Please watch the video interview or read it online.

Read the interview online:

featured paper

How SHP in plastic packaging addresses 3 key space application design challenges

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

TI’s SHP space-qualification level provides higher thermal efficiency, a smaller footprint and increased bandwidth compared to traditional ceramic packaging. The common package and pinout between the industrial- and space-grade versions enable you to get the newest technologies into your space hardware designs as soon as the commercial-grade device is sampling, because all prototyping work on the commercial product translates directly to a drop-in space-qualified SHP product.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Single Pair Ethernet : Simplifying IIoT & Automation

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Analog Devices and HARTING and Würth Elektronik

Industry 4.0 with its variety of sensing solutions and fieldbus systems can make communication pretty tricky but single pair ethernet can change all of that. In this episode of Chalk, Amelia Dalton chats with representatives from three different companies: Analog Devices, HARTING and Würth Elektronik to discuss the benefits of single pair Ethernet, what the new IEEE standard means to SPE designs, and what you should consider when working on your next single pair Ethernet design.

Click here for more information about Single Pair Ethernet solutions from Analog Devices, HARTING and Würth Elektronik