editor's blog
Subscribe Now

What Does ConnectOne’s “G2” Mean?

ConnectOne makes WiFi modules. And they recently announced a “G2” version. Being new to the details of these modules, I got a bit confused by the number of products bearing the “G2” label as well as the modes available – were they all available in one module, or were different modules for different modes? A conversation with GM and Sales VP Erez Lev helped put things in order.

As it turns out, you might say that ConnectOne sells one WiFi module into multiple form factors. Of the different modules I saw, it was the form factor – pins vs. board-to-board vs. SMT; internal vs. external antenna – that was different, not the functionality.

There are multiple modes that these modules can take on – and these are set up using software commands that can be executed in real time. So this isn’t just a design-time configuration; it can be done after deployment in the field.

The modes available are:

–          Embedded router

–          Embedded access point

–          LAN to WiFi bridge

–          Serial to LAN/WiFi bridge

–          Full internet controller

–          PPP emulator

But what about this “G2” thing? Their first-generation modules were based on Marvell’s 8686 chip. And that chip has been end-of-lifed. Or, perhaps better said, it’s been 86ed. So in deciding where to go next, they settled on a Broadcom baseband chip – something they said gave Broadcom a boost in an area they’re trying to penetrate.

G2N2_Top_and_bottom_400.png

But the challenge was in making this change transparent to users. Existing software invokes the new chip just like it did the old one, and this took a fair bit of work. They say they were successful, however, so that upgrading from the older to the newer version takes no effort; it just plugs in.

So “G2” reflects this move to the Broadcom chip as their 2nd-generation module family. From a feature standpoint, the big thing it gets them is 802.11n support. But they also have a number of unexposed features in their controller. Next year they’ll be announcing a “G3” version, with higher performance and… well, he didn’t share all of what’s coming. But G3 will have all of the same pinouts, form factors, APIs, etc. for a seamless upgrade from G2 (or G1, for that matter).

You can get more detail in their announcement.

 

Image courtesy ConnectOne

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 22, 2021
'μWaveRiders' 是ä¸ç³»åˆ—æ—¨å¨æŽ¢è®¨ Cadence AWR RF 产品的博客,按æˆæ›´æ–°ï¼Œå…¶å†…容涵盖 Cadence AWR Design Environment æ新的核心功能,专题视频ï¼...
Sep 22, 2021
3753 Cruithne is a Q-type, Aten asteroid in orbit around the Sun in 1:1 orbital resonance with the Earth, thereby making it a co-orbital object....
Sep 21, 2021
Learn how our high-performance FPGA prototyping tools enable RTL debug for chip validation teams, eliminating simulation/emulation during hardware debugging. The post High Debug Productivity Is the FPGA Prototyping Game Changer: Part 1 appeared first on From Silicon To Softw...
Aug 5, 2021
Megh Computing's Video Analytics Solution (VAS) portfolio implements a flexible and scalable video analytics pipeline consisting of the following elements: Video Ingestion Video Transformation Object Detection and Inference Video Analytics Visualization   Because Megh's ...

featured video

Gesture Detection for Automotive In-Cabin Applications

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

See how using 60GHz radar for automotive in-cabin gesture is ideal due to its small size and ability to sense through various materials. Applications using gesture control include changing radio stations, answering phone calls, opening windows, and more.

Click to learn more about gesture detection using 60GHz mmWave radar sensors

featured paper

Designing an Accurate, Multifunction Lithium-Ion Battery-Testing Solution

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

This paper highlights the benefits of a discrete solution over an integrated solution in order to meet current and future battery testing challenges. It also includes an example of a highly flexible battery testing design.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Time Sensitive Networking for Industrial Automation

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Intel

In control applications with strict deterministic requirements, such as those found in automotive and industrial domains, Time Sensitive Networking offers a way to send time-critical traffic over a standard Ethernet infrastructure. This enables the convergence of all traffic classes and multiple applications in one network. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Josh Levine of Intel and Patrick Loschmidt of TTTech about standards, specifications, and capabilities of time-sensitive networking (TSN).

Click here for more information about Intel Cyclone® V FPGAs