editor's blog
Subscribe Now

A New IoT Platform: RuBAN

Yet another Internet of Things (IoT) “platform” was announced recently: the RuBAN platform by Davra Networks. I enclosed the term in quotes not to question specifically whether this is a platform, but just as a reminder that the term “platform” means little – or perhaps it means too much, since there are many of them, and they’re all different in function and scope.

RuBAN targets not the Consumer IoT (CIoT), nor does it address the manufacturing side of IIoT. They do target Things that haven’t been connected before, relying on whatever instrumentation or data generation is already there (in other words, they don’t provide the sensors) – consistent with the brownfield approach we discussed the other day.

Examples of the applications on which they’re focusing are fleet management, mass transit ticketing and maintenance, oil/gas/mining, and security. The common denominators here are far-flung, distributed, and, often, mobile. As such, the cellular network plays an important part, much as we saw with Jasper the other day.

Davra’s direct customers will not be the owners of these networks, but rather the VARs building the networks and services. It’s a development environment intended for rapid deployment. The idea is to have a high-level way to quickly assemble rules, establish reporting, and devise alerts using point-and-click/drag-and-drop methodologies rather than detailed programming.

It’s an all-software solution, with gateways providing the key functionality. The gateways implement a “fog” function, executing rules and filtering data into the cloud. Each vehicle in a fleet, for example, may have a single gateway that channels location information (especially when establishing a geo-fence) or engine and other vehicle performance data for transmission into the cloud, where big-data functions can take over.

You can read more in their announcement, but, as with most platforms, a conversation will probably be needed to get the nitty-gritty details.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jun 14, 2021
By John Ferguson, Omar ElSewefy, Nermeen Hossam, Basma Serry We're all fascinated by light. Light… The post Shining a light on silicon photonics verification appeared first on Design with Calibre....
Jun 14, 2021
As a Southern California native, learning to surf is a must. Traveling elsewhere and telling people you’re from California without experiencing surfing is somewhat a surprise to most people. So, I have decided to take up surfing. It takes more practice than most people ...
Jun 14, 2021
The Cryptographers' Panel was moderated by RSA's Zulfikar Ramzan, and featured Ron Rivest (the R of RSA), Adi Shamir (the S of RSA), Ross Anderson (professor of security engineering at... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ...
Jun 10, 2021
Data & analytics have a massive impact on the chip design process; we explore how fast/precise chip data analytics solutions improve IC design quality & yield. The post The Importance of Chip Manufacturing & Test Data Analytics in the Semiconductor Industry ap...

featured video

Reduce Analog and Mixed-Signal Design Risk with a Unified Design and Simulation Solution

Sponsored by Cadence Design Systems

Learn how you can reduce your cost and risk with the Virtuoso and Spectre unified analog and mixed-signal design and simulation solution, offering accuracy, capacity, and high performance.

Click here for more information about Spectre FX Simulator

featured paper

Create Your Own Custom Chip for Less than $10K

Sponsored by Efabless

Imagine what your team could create if you could develop a custom analog/mixed-signal chip for under $10K. Efabless provides a pre-designed carrier chip which includes a RISC-V processor and subsystem along with ten square millimeters of customizable area, bundled together on a wafer shuttle targeting SkyWater's 130nm process and supported by open-source or proprietary tools for just $9,750.

Click to learn more

featured chalk talk

Thunderbolt Technology Overview

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Intel

Thunderbolt is the closest thing we’ve got to universal interconnect between a wide variety of devices and systems. With a universal USB-C connector, it can do video, power, data communication - all at scalable rates with smart adjustment. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Sandeep Vedanthi of Intel about the latest in Thunderbolt technology - Thunderbolt 4, which brings a number of benefits over previous versions.

Click here for more information about Intel 8000 series Thunderbolt™ 4 Controllers