editor's blog
Subscribe Now

What is a technology company?

Am I being picky or over-sensitive? A recent report talks about how Europe has produced 30 technology companies worth more than $1bn. They include “Clothing retailer Asos, games studio King Digital, property portfolio Zoopla and music service Spotify.” Are these technology companies? Zoopla’s core business is pulling together into a single web site, property listings from a wide range of sources. They do have other service for the estate agents whose properties they advertise and there is serious technology underlying this, but if you look at their job ads, of the 15 on the site today, only two are for technologists (Perl and Python developers). The rest are for people involved in the business of getting more ads onto their site and more users to the site.

Again Asos, which claims to be the most visited fashion and beauty website in the world, is in rag trade- it exists to sell clothes. Again serious underlying technology, but that is not the point.

Europe does have technology companies, ARM and Imagination, Infineon, STMicroelectronics are companies who create technology. So are companies who build systems using their products, such as Thales.

All financial organisations use massive amounts of technology: high frequency trading- a technology for gaming the markets that is under a great deal of critical scrutiny but somehow seems to be unstoppable – exploits mind staggering technologies, but even retail banking would be  impossible without technology, yet these companies are not labelled as technology companies.

Confusing companies who use technology to deliver a product or service with companies who create technology seems dangerous. When the dotcom bubble burst it was companies using technologies who were the problem, but the companies who create technology were equally hammered by the stock markets.

Since there is nothing we can do about it, I suppose I should just ignore it all and keep my fingers crossed that when this bubble bursts, real technology companies survive.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 9, 2020
I just read '€œEmpty World'€ by John Christopher, and I'€™m sure you will be as amazed as I to discover that this book has a hint of a sniff of the post-apocalyptic about it....
Jul 9, 2020
It happens all the time. We'€™re online with a designer and we'€™re looking at a connector in our picture search. He says '€œI need a connector that looks just like this one, but '€¦'€ and then he goes on to explain something he needs that'€™s unique to his desig...
Jul 3, 2020
[From the last episode: We looked at CNNs for vision as well as other neural networks for other applications.] We'€™re going to take a quick detour into math today. For those of you that have done advanced math, this may be a review, or it might even seem to be talking down...

featured video

Product Update: DesignWare MIPI C-PHY/D-PHY IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

Get the latest update on Synopsys' DesignWare MIPI C-PHY/D-PHY IP solution and how the 24 Gbps total bandwidth can enable your camera, display, automotive, drone, and image sensor SoCs implemented in advanced FinFET processes.

Click here for more information about Synopsys' DesignWare MIPI C-PHY/D-PHY IP solution

Featured Chalk Talk

Trends Driving the Future of Sensor Development

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and TE Connectivity

Sensors for IoT applications are changing and evolving rapidly these days. With experts predicting over a trillion sensors deployed worldwide, the pace of innovation in sensor technology has been accelerating, and design engineers need to keep up with the latest trends in order to get the best out of their IoT designs. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Pete Smith of TE Connectivity about the latest trends in sensor technology.

Click here for more information about TE Connectivity / Measurement Specialties MS5837-02BA26 Pressure Sensor Module