editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Synopsys Does… Software?

Synopsys has gone shopping again, and this time they went to a completely different mall. They came back with Coverity.

Just another acquisition? Nope… This one seems different.

Synopsys has had their nose to the grind working on chip design since… well, since their very beginning. Who knows how many acquisitions they’ve made (I’m sure someone’s kept count, but it’s not something I pay that much attention to), but all of them have had something to do with chip design.

There was possibly one chink with the EVE emulation acquisition: it’s about chip design too, but it allows more thorough validation of software on an SoC platform before that platform is committed to masks. (Although, if the rumors are true, the acquisition has decidedly not been good for the EVE product line…)

And, if you were paying close attention, you saw the key word: software. Seems that every now and then, CEO Aart de Geus might get a question about other areas that Synopsys might play in, including software. And each time it was a categorical answer that reinforced the steady Synopsys focus on chips, chips, chips.

But Coverity isn’t about designing chips. They’re about finding and fixing bugs in software. And not just software that will run on an SoC. I mean, yeah, that software, but also, any software for running anywhere. Their core customers are companies writing software that has to be clean and defect-free. (In other words, not Microsoft. OK, sorry, that was a cheap shot… far too easy…) Mission-critical software, where failure could cause harm or damage or a recall.

Their technology is based on static analysis techniques developed and spun out of Stanford. They’ve focused on integrating with large-scale development platforms, with complex build sequences and code bases. Decidedly not the kind of thing that’s been going on in the halls of Synopsys.

So this seems to indicate a significant change of direction for Synopsys. If not a move away from chips, then at least a first strike at something other than chips. Have they given up on getting the growth they expect (or the shareholders expect) from EDA alone? Are they going to enter the larger systems markets in a bigger way? Hard to say. But it’s also hard to imagine that their Coverity acquisition would be a one-off. Seems we should be watching for other moves outside the chip space.

More details in their release

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 6, 2022
With the DRAM fabrication advancing from 1x to 1y to 1z and further to 1a, 1b and 1c nodes along with the DRAM device speeds going up to 8533 for Lpddr5/8800 for DDR5, Data integrity is becoming a... ...
Jul 6, 2022
Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2022 is almost here! Explore EDA and cloud design tools, autonomous systems, AI, and more with our experts in San Francisco. The post DAC 2022: A Glimpse into the World of Design Automation from the Cloud to Cryogenic Computing appeared fir...
Jun 28, 2022
Watching this video caused me to wander off into the weeds looking at a weird and wonderful collection of wheeled implementations....

featured video

Demo: Achronix Speedster7t 2D NoC vs. Traditional FPGA Routing

Sponsored by Achronix

This demonstration compares an FPGA design utilizing Achronix Speedster7t 2D Network on Chip (NoC) for routing signals with the FPGA device, versus using traditional FPGA routing. The 2D NoC provides a 40% reduction in logic resources required with 40% less compile time needed versus using traditional FPGA routing. Speedster7t FPGAs are optimized for high-bandwidth workloads and eliminate the performance bottlenecks associated with traditional FPGAs.

Subscribe to Achronix's YouTube channel for the latest videos on how to accelerate your data using FPGAs and eFPGA IP

featured paper

Addressing high-voltage design challenges with reliable and affordable isolation tech

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Check out TI’s new white paper for an overview of galvanic isolation techniques, as well as how to improve isolated designs in electric vehicles, grid infrastructure, factory automation and motor drives.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Solar Cells Optimized for Indoor Applications

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and TDK

Solar cell technology is more popular than ever before, but we have only begun to scratch the surface when it comes to new applications for photovoltaic cell technology. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Chris Burket from TDK about the basics of photovoltaic cells, what sets TDK’s a-SI film solar cells away from other solar cell technology on the market today and the cool new applications that can take advantage of this powerful technology.

Click here for more information about TDK BCS Low Illumination Solar Cells