editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Gesture Oops

Someone I know got a new phone recently. It had gesture recognition capabilities. (No, I’m not going to name names. Partly because I don’t know.)

Fortunately, he was able to turn that feature off. And you’re not going to believe why he decided to do that.

Apparently, a “wave” gesture was used to end a phone call. And I’m sure that gesture was tested over and over, but only in the obvious use case: when you’re done with a call, you wave and the call ends.

Only one problem, and apparently this must not have been tested, since it’s so egregious. When a call comes in and you try to answer the call? By bringing your hand up to the screen? Yup: it sees that as a wave and ends the call before you even answered it.

This happened enough times that he gave up and turned off the feature.

Years ago, I got a PC with fingerprint security. I tried over and over to get it to read my fingerprint consistently, and it couldn’t. So I disabled that feature, fearing that I might end up locked out of my own computer. More importantly, I mentally wrote that feature off, and I’ve never tried it since. Even though it probably works a lot better now.

Short-sighted? Maybe. But heck, I’m human. And lots of people do that with new features.

So we may now have a cluster of people that are deciding that gesture recognition doesn’t work based on this goofy oops. It boggles my mind that a phone could have made it out into the wild working like that; maybe it’s something else going wrong, but it doesn’t matter. The user’s experience was that attempting to answer a call would hang the call up. Shutting off gesture recognition solved the problem.

Time to go back and review the testing scenarios…

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 14, 2019
In addition to playing retro games, THEC64 allows you to write your own programs in C64 or VIC 20 BASIC....
Nov 14, 2019
The Cadence Academic Network hosted an Academic Speaker Series event, in collaboration with the Shanghai Site Technical Talk series, in Cadence Shanghai Office. The talk attracted more than 150... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ]...
Nov 14, 2019
Scientists, researchers, and data analysts from academia, industry and government agencies will be center stage at SC19 next week in Denver. SC19 is the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage, and Analysis. Next-generation high-performanc...
Nov 13, 2019
By Elven Huang – Mentor, A Siemens Business SRAM debugging at advanced nodes is challenging. With pattern matching and similarity checking, Calibre tools enable designers to more quickly and precisely locate SRAM modification errors and determine the correct fix. Static...
Nov 8, 2019
[From the last episode: we looked at the differences between computing at the edge and in the cloud.] We'€™ve looked at the differences between MCUs and SoCs, but the one major thing that they have in common is that they have a CPU. Now'€¦ anyone can define their own CPU ...