editor's blog
Subscribe Now

An Accelerometer GUI

Including an accelerometer in your system is easy these days, right? Heck, they can trigger interrupts in your processor, so just toss it in, wait for the fateful interrupt, and let your handler do the rest. Right?

Actually… no. There are numerous controls that you have – and will likely want to take advantage of – to optimize how your accelerometer works. Those settings have a significant impact on noise and power. Sampling rate is a good example: the faster you sample, the more accurate your reading will be (i.e., lower noise). But that also increases power consumption. There are a whole slew of registers in the accelerometer that contain all of the settings, and the datasheets tell you how to get to each one.

Problem is, you mostly need to do that through code, typically. That can mean iterating through your start-up code, for example, to load different values and see what happens. And that last bit is important: you might actually have to exercise the thing to figure out where the best balance is. Lots of back-and-forth changing settings, measuring, rinsing, and repeating.

The other alternative has been to use an accelerometer that has been simplified, with a few crude settings that may or may not represent the best mix for your system.

Kionix recently announced a tool to provide easier access to the fine-grained detail in their accelerometers. The idea behind this FlexSet Performance Optimizer is to make detailed adjustments almost as easy as the crude ones on simplified accelerometers.

At the first level, this is a GUI into the register set. So at the very least, it’s easy to see and change register values. At the next level, the tool will provide information on the power and noise implications of your settings – meaning you don’t need to exercise the thing to figure out the impact of your selected settings. And at yet a higher level, you can do side-by-side comparisons of different cases.

The hooks for this are built into their latest accelerometers and will support new ones going forward. The GUI itself can be downloaded or run on the internet. (Presumably the one on the internet won’t actually set the settings in your accelerometer, just figure out what those settings should be. Unless, I suppose, you’ve connected your accelerometer to the internet…)

You can find more in their release.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 6, 2022
With the DRAM fabrication advancing from 1x to 1y to 1z and further to 1a, 1b and 1c nodes along with the DRAM device speeds going up to 8533 for Lpddr5/8800 for DDR5, Data integrity is becoming a... ...
Jul 6, 2022
Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2022 is almost here! Explore EDA and cloud design tools, autonomous systems, AI, and more with our experts in San Francisco. The post DAC 2022: A Glimpse into the World of Design Automation from the Cloud to Cryogenic Computing appeared fir...
Jun 28, 2022
Watching this video caused me to wander off into the weeds looking at a weird and wonderful collection of wheeled implementations....

featured video

Synopsys 112G Ethernet IP Interoperating with Optical Components & Equalizing E-O-E Link

Sponsored by Synopsys

This OFC 2022 demo features the Synopsys 112G Ethernet IP directly equalizing electrical-optical-electrical (E-O-E) channel and supporting retimer-free CEI-112G linear drive for low-power applications.

Learn More

featured paper

Addressing high-voltage design challenges with reliable and affordable isolation tech

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Check out TI’s new white paper for an overview of galvanic isolation techniques, as well as how to improve isolated designs in electric vehicles, grid infrastructure, factory automation and motor drives.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Current Sense Resistor - WFC & WFCP Series

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Vishay

If you are working on a telecom, consumer or industrial design, current sense resistors can give you a great way to detect and convert current to voltage. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Clinton Stiffler from Vishay about the what, where and how of Vishay’s WFC and WFCP current sense resistors. They investigate how these current sense resistors are constructed, how the flip-chip design of these current sense resistors reduces TCR compared to other chip resistors, and how you can get started using a Vishay current sense resistor in your next design.

Click here for more information about Vishay / Dale WFC/WFCP Metal Foil Current Sense Resistors