editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Antenna Tuning Without MEMS

Quite some time ago, we reported on WiSpry, a MEMS company that was using its technology to switch capacitors so that the antenna tuning can be optimized and changed in real time as conditions and needs change.

Much more recently, a new solution was announced based on collaboration between Taoglas, who makes antenna assemblies, and Peregrine, who produces an array of digitally-switchable capacitors (amongst other things). They’ve combined the two into a module that can fit into phones and other devices like automobile telematics and patient monitoring devices that have to be small and yet communicate afar. Go ahead and click here for more information on how to sell your car easily online. You might think this sounds just like what WiSpry is doing, but, while they’re attacking the same basic problem, their solutions are very different.

Peregrine’s capacitors aren’t actuated by MEMS elements; they’re switched electronically using Peregrine’s UltraCMOS process, which relies on silicon-on-sapphire technology to provide good RF performance. So they’re purely electrical where WiSpry (and also Cavendish Kinetics) is electromechanical.

So which one is better? I asked what the benefit of the electrical version is, and I can oversimplify the answer as being, “We can actually produce ours reliably.” (They didn’t articulate that in a snarky fashion, to be clear… Yeah, I’m sexing it up to keep your attention…) Which suggests, of course, that MEMS makers can’t.

So I asked both WiSpry and Cavendish Kinetics about this; I can’t imagine either one of them saying, “Oh yeah, our production sucks!” even if it were true (and, for the record, I’m not saying it is). But it’s only right to let them respond, so I checked in. Cavendish Kinetics’ Marketing and Biz Dev EVP Larry Morrell said that they have real customer designs in the works, but that they haven’t reached production status yet.

But significantly, he said, “Based on our collective management experience (and the management team has done all this before), we are on a normal yield learning curve for a CMOS process.  So we are tracking to our plan and the yields are improving monthly.  Our current yield levels are well above minimum requirements to be able to predict fab output to support customers.” Carefully worded; it suggests to me that yields aren’t great today (a threshold of predicting output simply means stable, not high) – but if they can support customers without going out of business, that’s all that matters to customers. They expect production this year and capacity in the 10s of millions per month by the end of the year. [Update note: more clarification on Cavendish Kinetics yields can be found here.]

I did not receive a reply from WiSpry by “print” time.

You can find out more about the Peregrine/Taoglas offering in their release.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
May 26, 2022
Introducing Synopsys Learning Center, an online, on-demand library of self-paced training modules, webinars, and labs designed for both new & experienced users. The post New Synopsys Learning Center Makes Training Easier and More Accessible appeared first on From Silico...
May 26, 2022
CadenceLIVE Silicon Valley is back as an in-person event for 2022, in the Santa Clara Convention Center as usual. The event will take place on Wednesday, June 8 and Thursday, June 9. Vaccination You... ...
May 25, 2022
There are so many cool STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) toys available these days, and I want them all!...
May 24, 2022
By Neel Natekar Radio frequency (RF) circuitry is an essential component of many of the critical applications we now rely… ...

featured video

Building safer robots with computer vision & AI

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Watch TI's demo to see how Jacinto™ 7 processors fuse deep learning and traditional computer vision to enable safer autonomous mobile robots.

Watch demo

featured paper

Introducing new dynamic features for exterior automotive lights with DLP® technology

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Exterior lighting, primarily used to illuminate ground areas near the vehicle door, can now be transformed into a projection system used for both vehicle communication and unique styling features. A small lighting module that utilizes automotive-grade digital micromirror devices, such as the DLP2021-Q1 or DLP3021-Q1, can display an endless number of patterns in any color imaginable as well as communicate warnings and alerts to drivers and other vehicles.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Power Profiler II

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Nordic Semiconductor

If you are working on a low-power IoT design, you are going to face power issues that can get quite complicated. Addressing these issues earlier in your design process can save you a lot of time, effort, and frustration. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kristian Sæther from Nordic Semiconductor about the details of the new Nordic Power Profiler Kit II - including how it can measure actual current, help you configure the right design settings, and show you a visualized power profile for your next design.

Click here for more information about the Nordic Semiconductor Power Profiler Kit II (PPK2)