editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Getting Beyond “It Depends” for Certification

More and more electronics are going into places where they could cause real damage if they don’t work right. Things like airplanes and weapons and, in particular, the systems that control them. That goes for hardware and software.

So there are elaborate standards controlling how things have to be done in order to pass muster for such systems. DO-178, DO-278, and DO-254 are only the most visible of these. The problem is that the standards don’t actually tell you what has to be done. They outline a broad process for certification, but exactly what is supposed to happen relies on a key individual: the “designated engineering representative,” or DER.

If you ask, in general, how you get a system certified, the answer is, “It depends.” And one of the things it depends on is the DER. You work with the DER to decide what you need to do for your system to be certified. And just because you did a particular set of things with one DER for one system doesn’t mean you can simply replicate that process with a different DER on another system. If the other DER has different ideas about how things should be done, then you have to go in that direction for the new project.

I (thankfully) don’t live in that particular world, but that’s got to be completely frustrating.

LDRA has offered up a Compliance Management System to help with this. It’s a certification process based on a particular individual, Todd White’s, 30 years of experience as a DER. It incorporates a system of checklists, matrices, and document templates intended to speed the certification process.

It works hand in hand with their certification consulting services, which are probably helpful to ensuring that this works most seamlessly. Using a different DER would, presumably, run the risk of that DER wanting something different. You would think, if these are truly proven elements for certification, that any reasonable DER would be happy to include them into a certification plan – unless they have their own system and insist on doing it their way.

So there’s still the possibility of some “it depends” in the mix, but the goal appears to be to remove some of it.

You can find out more in their recent release.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
May 16, 2021
https://youtu.be/_wup2MSTVks Made on Communication Hill, San Jose (camera Carey Guo) Monday: Intel eASIC: Linley and DARPA Tuesday: Please Excuse the Mesh: CFD and Pointwise Wednesday: Linley:... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ]]...
May 13, 2021
Samtec will attend the PCI-SIG Virtual Developers Conference on Tuesday, May 25th through Wednesday, May 26th, 2021. This is a free event for the 800+ member companies that develop and bring to market new products utilizing PCI Express technology. Attendee Registration is sti...
May 13, 2021
Our new IC design tool, PrimeSim Continuum, enables the next generation of hyper-convergent IC designs. Learn more from eeNews, Electronic Design & EE Times. The post Synopsys Makes Headlines with PrimeSim Continuum, an Innovative Circuit Simulation Solution appeared fi...
May 13, 2021
By Calibre Design Staff Prior to the availability of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, multi-patterning provided… The post A SAMPle of what you need to know about SAMP technology appeared first on Design with Calibre....

featured video

Introduction to EMI

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Conducted versus radiated EMI. CISPR-25 and CISPR-32 standards. High-frequency or low-frequency emissions. Designing a system to reduce EMI can be overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. Watch this video to get an overview of EMI causes, standards, and mitigation techniques.

Click here for more information

featured paper

How to solve two screenless TV design challenges

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

The new 4K display chipsets from DLP Products help make screenless TV setup easier and save cost by reducing the number of components required while also adding more advanced image-processing capabilities. The DLP471TP DMD and DLPC6540 controller for small designs and the DLP471TE DMD and DLPC7540 controller for designs above 1,500 lumens help deliver stunning ultra-high resolution displays to the market and take advantage of the rapid expansion in the availability of 4K content.

Click here to read

featured chalk talk

Time Sensitive Networking for Industrial Automation

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Intel

In control applications with strict deterministic requirements, such as those found in automotive and industrial domains, Time Sensitive Networking offers a way to send time-critical traffic over a standard Ethernet infrastructure. This enables the convergence of all traffic classes and multiple applications in one network. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Josh Levine of Intel and Patrick Loschmidt of TTTech about standards, specifications, and capabilities of time-sensitive networking (TSN).

Click here for more information about Intel Cyclone® V FPGAs