editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Pressing Vinyl (Or Something Similar)

You’d think a complete new technology for patterning silicon would merit a long, involved story. And yet it’s just not that complicated. (Easy for me to say…) One of the up-and-coming lithography processes under development is called “nanoimprint lithography” (NIL). It might be hard to imagine that this would work, but, just like it sounds, it involves taking a master “stamp” and impressing it into a liquid resist.

You then harden the resist with some exposure to UV light and release the master. The pattern on the wafer can then direct further more standard processing.

The crazy thing about this is that nanometer-scale features can print using a printer for stickers. You’d think that the liquid might have trouble conforming to such miniscule hollows in the template. And some of the issues you might think could arise – like parts of the pattern slumping or collapsing after the template is removed – truly are issues that are being studied and addressed.

Right now, researchers are working in the 26-nm realm (according to presentations at SPIE Litho), but they are trying to use the same process as HGST used for their hard drive project – creating working templates from a master template. Quality is still a challenge for those working templates, making this most suitable for applications having large-scale repeated features for which redundancy can be provided for repair.

The presenter from Dai Nippon Printing said that full production is targeted for two years out. We’ll continue to track it… If you get the SPIE Litho proceedings, you can find more in paper 8680-2.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jan 19, 2022
Explore the importance of system interoperability in hyperscale data centers and why it matters for AI and high-performance computing (HPC) applications. The post Why Interoperability Matters for High-Performance Computing and AI Chip Designs appeared first on From Silicon T...
Jan 19, 2022
2001 was famous for some of the worst security issues (accompanied by obligatory picture of bad guy in a black hoodie): The very first blog post of the year covered SolarWinds. See my post The... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ]]...
Jan 18, 2022
This column should more properly be titled 'Danny MacAskill Meets Elvis Presley Meets Bollywood Meets Cultural Appropriation,' but I can't spell '˜appropriation.'...

featured video

Synopsys & Samtec: Successful 112G PAM-4 System Interoperability

Sponsored by Synopsys

This Supercomputing Conference demo shows a seamless interoperability between Synopsys' DesignWare 112G Ethernet PHY IP and Samtec's NovaRay IO and cable assembly. The demo shows excellent performance, BER at 1e-08 and total insertion loss of 37dB. Synopsys and Samtec are enabling the industry with a complete 112G PAM-4 system, which is essential for high-performance computing.

Click here for more information about DesignWare Ethernet IP Solutions

featured paper

nanoPower Module Extends Battery Life in Space-Constrained Applications

Sponsored by Analog Devices

Designers can now increase battery life and reduce size in space-constrained IoT devices with a power module that features the lowest quiescent current compared to competitive solutions and uSLIC built-in inductor technology that reduces solution size by up to 37%.

Read Now

featured chalk talk

Single Pair Ethernet : Simplifying IIoT & Automation

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Analog Devices

Industry 4.0 with its variety of sensing solutions and fieldbus systems can make communication pretty tricky but single pair ethernet can change all of that. In this episode of Chalk, Amelia Dalton chats with representatives from three different companies: Analog Devices, HARTING and Würth Elektronik to discuss the benefits of single pair Ethernet, what the new IEEE standard means to SPE designs, and what you should consider when working on your next single pair Ethernet design.

Click here for more information about Single Pair Ethernet solutions from Analog Devices, HARTING and Würth Elektronik