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I Sing the Body Electric

Microchip has just rolled out BodyCom, a new way to do wireless nwtworking using your own body as the antenna. This is a body-area network, meaning it connects things you’re wearing — or at least, touching. That makes it useful for sensors and displays, for example, but not for beaming music to a remote speaker. Microschip’s got all the documentation, software, and development kits here. http://www.microchip.com/pagehandler/en-us/technology/embeddedsecurity/technology/bodycom.html.

 

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