editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Multicore Best Practices

The hardest thing that multicore has had going for it is the perception that it’s hard. OK, that plus the fact that it is, in fact, hard. Or it can be. Although familiarity and tools are improving that. Nevertheless, it’s been a slow slog as multicore has gradually made its way into the embedded consciousness.

Part of the problem is that there is no one right answer for multicore anything. No one right architecture, no one right core, no one right set of tools, no one right way to write software. It all depends on what you’re trying to do. So it’s impossible simply to say, “Here’s how you do it, now off you go.”

The alternative, as envisioned by the Multicore Association, has been to compile a set of best practices, assembled by early adopters, for the benefit of relative newbies. And, frankly, the not-so-newbies – there’s always something more to learn. (And perhaps even debate.) That compilation has just been announced: a snapshot of multicore dos and don’ts summarized in a mere 100-odd pages.

After some basic overviews, it deals with high-level design, then low-level design, followed by debug and performance tuning. As you might suspect, covering so many topics in such a succinct fashion would make this less of a multicore primer and more of a hand-up once you’ve got your arms around multicore basics. In fact, it’s probably one of those things that’s best to take on after you’ve screwed up a project or two (hopefully as learning exercises, not as business disasters). OK, “screwed up” is possibly too strong; let’s say that some months of struggle with various non-obvious multicore issues will make this a rather more accessible document. And probably one that bears re-reading from time to time, since you’ll probably pick up more each time.

You can find your way to more information and the document itself via their announcement.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Mar 27, 2020
[From the last episode: We saw how pointers are an important kind of variable, representing data whose location we can'€™t predict in advance.] We saw last time that pointers are used to store the addresses of data stored in memory space that'€™s allocated while the progr...
Mar 27, 2020
Have you ever paused to consider how temptingly tasty electronic circuits would look if their components and copper tracks were mounted on a glass substrate?...
Mar 27, 2020
Solar Power While the cost and benefits of solar power can and have been debated, there'€™s one point that cannot be debated:  the solar energy sector continues to grow.   The solar energy sector has grown 68% over the last decade, and the cost of solar infrastruc...
Mar 26, 2020
Late last week you may have seen the open letter  from our CEO, Tony Hemmelgarn, laying out the steps that Siemens Digital Industries Software is taking to support our customers during the COVID-19 global crisis. All of us are getting use to the “new normal” ...

Featured Video

Automotive Trends Driving New SoC Architectures -- Synopsys

Sponsored by Synopsys

Today’s automotive trends are driving new design requirements for automotive SoCs targeting ADAS, gateways, connected cars and infotainment. Find out why it is essential to use pre-designed, pre-verified, reusable automotive-optimized IP to meet such new requirements and accelerate design time.

Drive Your Next Design to Completion Today with DesignWare IP® for Automotive SoCs