editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Molly to the Rescue

Graphene has excited technologists for years now, with its promise of high mobility, strength, and flexibility. Except for one big problem: no bandgap. So you can’t really turn off your devices.

Out of left field, then, comes something completely different at IEDM: MoS2. Deposited using CVD over a large area, a single layer configures itself as a layer of molybdenum sandwiched between two layers of sulfur. It’s flexible, it has high mobility – and it has a 1.8-V bandgap.

A team from MIT, the US Army Research Lab, and the Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences in Taiwan not only demonstrated the basic electrical capabilities of the material, but actually built devices, both analog (including current sources and ADCs) and digital (a depletion-mode NAND gate).

This actually competes less with small-scale circuitry and more with large-area flexible circuits, which typically utilize relatively poorly-performing materials like amorphous silicon and organics. Mobility in such devices can be less than 10 cm2/Vs. The MoS2 material achieved higher than 190 cm2/Vs, with an on-off current ratio greater than 106 and current density close to 20 µA/µm, with excellent current saturation characteristics. And the circuits worked.

For those of you with the IEDM proceedings, you can find out more in paper 4.6.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 10, 2020
[From the last episode: We looked at the convolution that defines the CNNs that are so popular for machine vision applications.] This week we'€™re going to do some more math, although, in this case, it won'€™t be as obscure and bizarre as convolution '€“ and yet we will...
Jul 10, 2020
I need a problem that lends itself to being solved using a genetic algorithm; also, one whose evolving results can be displayed on my 12 x 12 ping pong ball array....
Jul 9, 2020
It happens all the time. We'€™re online with a designer and we'€™re looking at a connector in our picture search. He says '€œI need a connector that looks just like this one, but '€¦'€ and then he goes on to explain something he needs that'€™s unique to his desig...

featured video

Product Update: Protect IoT SoCs with DesignWare OTP NVM IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

Join Krishna Balachandran in this discussion on Synopsys DesignWare OTP NVM IP, including security, performance, power, and cost considerations. With more than 12 years of development and deployment by 500+ customers, Synopsys is the leader in antifuse-based OTP NVM IP.

Click here for more information about Synopsys DesignWare OTP NVM IP

Featured Chalk Talk

Maxim's First Secure Micro with ChipDNA PUF Technology

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Maxim Integrated

Most applications today demand security, and that starts with your microcontroller. In order to get a truly secure MCU, you need a root of trust such as a physically unclonable function (PUF). In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Kris Ardis of Maxim Integrated about how the Maxim MAX32520 MCU with PUF can secure your next design.

Click here for more info about Amphenol RF 5G Wireless Connectors