editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Between Driver and Fusion

I recently got a chance to talk with Hillcrest Labs, another big mover in the motion market. In fact, their pedigree sounds remarkably like that of Movea, whom we’ve looked at in the past: starting with interactive TV and transitioning to broader motion.

They’ve gone on to develop a gesture library (released, but, to date, un-officially-announced) that includes more than 50 gestures, including the typical control gestures, numerals, letters, cardinal directions, and rotations.

We discussed the usual sensor fusion stuff, which, of course, is now bread and butter for them. They do this in a sensor-agnostic way, writing drivers from the data sheets and using an internal lab to characterize the sensors to obtain data not available in the datasheets.

The drivers exist at the lowest level of the software stack, protecting the upper layers from the specifics of different sensors. Sensor fusion is above that. But there is actually something they point to between the driver and the fusion that they feel themselves to be particularly strong in: calibration.

And this isn’t just individual sensor calibration; they do it across sensors (so, for instance, a compass and gyroscope can cross-calibrate each other). This might sound like fusion, but the goal is different. The goal of fusion is to use multi-sensor data to get some higher-order information. The goal of calibration – even if done across sensors – is to make sure the data itself is accurate.

A few months ago they announced their official entry into the mobile market; you can see the details of that in their release.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 6, 2020
If you were in the possession of one of these bodacious beauties, what sorts of games and effects would you create using the little scamp?...
Jul 3, 2020
[From the last episode: We looked at CNNs for vision as well as other neural networks for other applications.] We'€™re going to take a quick detour into math today. For those of you that have done advanced math, this may be a review, or it might even seem to be talking down...
Jul 2, 2020
In June, we continued to upgrade several key pieces of content across the website, including more interactive product explorers on several pages and a homepage refresh. We also made a significant update to our product pages which allows logged-in users to see customer-specifi...

Featured Video

Product Update: Advances in DesignWare Die-to-Die PHY IP

Sponsored by Synopsys

Hear the latest about Synopsys' DesignWare Die-to-Die PHY IP for SerDes-based 112G USR/XSR and parallel-based HBI interfaces. The IP, available in advanced FinFET processes, addresses the power, bandwidth, and latency requirements of high-performance computing SoCs targeting hyperscale data center, AI, and networking applications.

Click here for more information about DesignWare Die-to-Die PHY IP Solutions

Featured Paper

Cryptography: A Closer Look at the Algorithms

Sponsored by Maxim Integrated

Get more details about how cryptographic algorithms are implemented and how an asymmetric key algorithm can be used to exchange a shared private key.

Click here to download the whitepaper

Featured Chalk Talk

Mindi Analog Simulator

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Microchip

It’s easy to go wrong in the analog portion of your design, particularly if you’re not an analog “expert.” Electrical simulation can help reduce risk and design re-spins. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Rico Brooks of Microchip about the MPLAB Mindi tool, and how it can help reduce your design risk.

Click here for more information about MINDI Analog Simulator.