editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Another Tool in the Cloud

We saw recently that Protecode added an online capability for a quick audit of software on a one-off basis. It involves upload by a user, automated analysis by Protecode-side tools, and then a manual review at Protecode just to make sure everything looks right. The tools themselves are hidden from the user.

They’ve now gone one step further and offered their tools outright through the cloud. To understand their motivation, it helps to review what their tools do. They analyze software – and we’re talking potentially huge projects involving many thousands of files – to establish both the source of any code that came from outside the company and the rights and obligations associated with the licenses for that code. It becomes a kind of software pedigree or provenance.

Some companies use this on an ongoing basis for a wide range of development projects; these tend to be large companies, and they install the tools the old-fashioned way. But some smaller companies or even investors want to check out code ad hoc when some sort of business deal is underway; this becomes part of the due diligence. The QuickAudit is one way to do that.

But in between, some companies may do analysis a couple times a year, in conjunction with major releases, for example. They don’t need the tool running all the time, but they have bigger projects than are allowed with the QuickAudit capability.

So these guys are the targets of the cloud implementation. There’s actually a second group they’re targeting as well: developers that have grown up doing all kinds of things in the cloud, and who therefore aren’t as concerned about it.

Subscribers get a dedicated machine at RackSpace as long as they have an active account. Protecode looked into providing “suspend” and “resume” capabilities, but they decided it wasn’t worth the effort. Unlike the quick audit offering, the cloud tool is full-featured (minus some features that were nonsensical in the cloud).

They can also install the cloud version on a private cloud, presumably with suitable inducements…

You can find more in their release.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 6, 2022
With the DRAM fabrication advancing from 1x to 1y to 1z and further to 1a, 1b and 1c nodes along with the DRAM device speeds going up to 8533 for Lpddr5/8800 for DDR5, Data integrity is becoming a... ...
Jul 6, 2022
Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2022 is almost here! Explore EDA and cloud design tools, autonomous systems, AI, and more with our experts in San Francisco. The post DAC 2022: A Glimpse into the World of Design Automation from the Cloud to Cryogenic Computing appeared fir...
Jun 28, 2022
Watching this video caused me to wander off into the weeds looking at a weird and wonderful collection of wheeled implementations....

featured video

Synopsys PCIe 6.0 IP TX and RX Successful Interoperability with Keysight

Sponsored by Synopsys

This DesignCon 2022 video features Synopsys PHY IP for PCIe 6.0 showing wide open PAM-4 eyes, good jitter breakdown decomposition on the Keysight oscilloscope, excellent receiver performance, and simulation-to-silicon correlation.

Click here for more information

featured paper

Addressing high-voltage design challenges with reliable and affordable isolation tech

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Check out TI’s new white paper for an overview of galvanic isolation techniques, as well as how to improve isolated designs in electric vehicles, grid infrastructure, factory automation and motor drives.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

56 Gbps PAM4 Performance in FPGA Applications

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Samtec

If you are working on an FPGA design, the choice of a connector solution can be a crucial element in your system design. Your FPGA connector solution needs to support the highest of speeds, small form factors, and emerging architectures. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton joins Matthew Burns to chat about you can get 56 Gbps PAM4 performance in your next FPGA application. We take a closer look at Samtec’s AcceleRate® HD High-Density Arrays, the details of Samtec’s Flyover Technology, and why Samtec’s complete portfolio of high-performance interconnects are a perfect fit for 56 Gbps PAM4 FPGA Applications.

Click here for more information about Samtec AcceleRate® Slim Body Direct Attach Cable Assembly