editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Another Tool in the Cloud

We saw recently that Protecode added an online capability for a quick audit of software on a one-off basis. It involves upload by a user, automated analysis by Protecode-side tools, and then a manual review at Protecode just to make sure everything looks right. The tools themselves are hidden from the user.

They’ve now gone one step further and offered their tools outright through the cloud. To understand their motivation, it helps to review what their tools do. They analyze software – and we’re talking potentially huge projects involving many thousands of files – to establish both the source of any code that came from outside the company and the rights and obligations associated with the licenses for that code. It becomes a kind of software pedigree or provenance.

Some companies use this on an ongoing basis for a wide range of development projects; these tend to be large companies, and they install the tools the old-fashioned way. But some smaller companies or even investors want to check out code ad hoc when some sort of business deal is underway; this becomes part of the due diligence. The QuickAudit is one way to do that.

But in between, some companies may do analysis a couple times a year, in conjunction with major releases, for example. They don’t need the tool running all the time, but they have bigger projects than are allowed with the QuickAudit capability.

So these guys are the targets of the cloud implementation. There’s actually a second group they’re targeting as well: developers that have grown up doing all kinds of things in the cloud, and who therefore aren’t as concerned about it.

Subscribers get a dedicated machine at RackSpace as long as they have an active account. Protecode looked into providing “suspend” and “resume” capabilities, but they decided it wasn’t worth the effort. Unlike the quick audit offering, the cloud tool is full-featured (minus some features that were nonsensical in the cloud).

They can also install the cloud version on a private cloud, presumably with suitable inducements…

You can find more in their release.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jan 17, 2020
I once met Steve Wozniak, or he once met me (it's hard to remember the nitty-gritty details)....
Jan 17, 2020
[From the last episode: We saw how virtual memory helps resolve the differences between where a compiler thinks things will go in memory and the real memories in a real system.] We'€™ve talked a lot about memory '€“ different kinds of memory, cache memory, heap memory, vi...
Jan 16, 2020
While Samtec started as a connector company with a focus on two-piece, pin-and-socket board stacking systems, High-Speed Board Stacking connectors and High-Speed Cable Assemblies now make up a significant portion of our sales. To support development in this area, in December ...
Jan 16, 2020
Betting on Hydrogen-Powered Cars On-demand DRC within P&R cuts closure time in half for MaxLinear Functional Safety Verification For AV SoC Designs Accelerated With Advanced Tools Automating the pain out of clock domain crossing verification Mentor unpacks LVS and LVL iss...

Featured Video

RedFit IDC SKEDD Connector

Sponsored by Wurth Electronics and Mouser Electronics

Why attach a header connector to your PCB when you really don’t need one? If you’re plugging a ribbon cable into your board, particularly for a limited-use function such as provisioning, diagnostics, or testing, it can be costly and clunky to add a header connector to your BOM, and introduce yet another component to pick and place. Wouldn’t it be great if you could plug directly into your board with no connector required on the PCB side? In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Ben Arden from Wurth Electronics about Redfit, a slick new connector solution that plugs directly into standard via holes on your PCB.

Click here for more information about Wurth Electronics REDFIT IDC SKEDD Connector