editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Graphene Quilts

A while back we looked at wide bandgap materials like GaN when used for power devices, but, along with power comes heat and the need for it to be dissipated. GaN isn’t great for that; the old sapphire substrates were very bad, and newer (and more expensive) SiC substrates are better but not sufficient, according to researchers at UC Riverside.

Metal is often used as a heat sink, but its ability to do so in very thin films dissipates because the main “mobile” element is the electron. In graphene, however, the main dissipative component is the phonon – essentially, the ability to carry the crystal vibration efficiently, and this remains effective even for just a few layers.

So they built transistors with “quilts” of graphene on the actual transistor drains, connecting it to graphite heat sinks (although they say other heat sinks are possible too). These can be more effective because they insinuate themselves deep into the circuit without substantially disrupting the topology due to their use of “few-layer graphene” (FLG).

Of course, today, graphene is typically obtained by flaking graphite – something of an inexact science. They see graphene growth as a reality in the future, which would make the whole process a bit more deterministic.

You can find out more and get access to a paper published in Nature here

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Sep 23, 2020
CadenceLIVE 2020 India, our first digital conference held on 9-10 September and what an event it was! With 75 technical paper presentations, four keynotes, a virtual exhibition area, and fun... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community site. ]]...
Sep 22, 2020
If you are at all interested in digital signal processing (DSP), then the DSP Online Conference is the place to '€œsee and be seen'€ -- register now before all the good seats are snapped up!...
Sep 22, 2020
I am a child of the 80s.  I grew up when the idea of home computing was very new.  My first experience of any kind of computer was an Apple II that my Dad brought home from work. It was the only computer his company possessed, and every few weeks he would need to cr...
Sep 18, 2020
[From the last episode: We put the various pieces of a memory together to show the whole thing.] Before we finally turn our memory discussion into an AI discussion, let'€™s take on one annoying little detail that I'€™ve referred to a few times, but have kept putting off. ...

Featured Video

AI SoC Chats: Primitive Math IP for AI

Sponsored by Synopsys

Learn about the market trends and challenges around primitive math functions (floating point and integer math) in AI chipset development, and how DesignWare IP can help.

Click here for more information about DesignWare IP for Amazing AI

Featured Paper

An Introduction to Automotive LIDAR

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

This white paper is an introduction to industrial and automotive time-of-flight (ToF) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) solutions to serve next-generation autonomous systems.

Click here to download the whitepaper

Featured Chalk Talk

Smart Embedded Vision with PolarFire FPGAs

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Microchip

In embedded vision applications, doing AI inference at the edge is often required in order to meet performance and latency demands. But, AI inference requires massive computing power, which can exceed our overall power budget. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton talks to Avery Williams of Microchip about using FPGAs to get the machine vision performance you need, without blowing your power, form factor, and thermal requirements.

More information about Microsemi / Microchip PolarFire FPGA Video & Imaging Kit