editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Brighter LEDs

Cree has been manufacturing press releases on brighter LEDs almost as fast as they are (presumably) making the LEDs themselves. And, in one release, they credit a technology they call SC3 for the advances. But, as with many such technology brandings, they didn’t really say much about what it was.

Was it a revolutionary new approach? A big “aha” moment catapulting them forward? Or a collection of incremental things that they bound together and let the marketing department call a “technology”?

Well, its kinda some of both. There’s one big differentiator: they (and only they, as they tell it) use SiC, which they say is 5-10% more efficient, instead of sapphire. We’ve discussed the use of SiC for power devices, so we know there are other companies taking advantage of SiC technology. Why not for LEDs?

Because it’s too expensive. So… why can Cree do it? Because they make their own wafers.

Cree has been manufacturing SiC wafers for 20 or so years. They get to use their own stock; all other LED manufacturers purchase their stock from someone else, and that seems to be enough to make the difference economically for Cree. At least as they tell it.

There are other aspects to what constitutes SC3, encompassing chip design (they have little to say about this other than the fact that the “X” configuration on some of the LEDs hints at some elements); packaging (like a slightly larger dome – talk about incremental!); and the phosphors they use (absolutely tight-lipped about this… sorry… I tried…).

You can scan their release (and follow their links) yourself to see if you can discern anything more. If you do, please share with us in comments below!

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 30, 2022
By Joe Davis Sponsored by France's ElectroniqueS magazine, the Electrons d'Or Award program identifies the most innovative products of the… ...
Nov 29, 2022
Smart manufacturing '“ the use of nascent technology within the industrial Internet of things (IIoT) to address traditional manufacturing challenges '“ is leading a supply chain revolution, resulting in smart, connected, and intelligent environments, capable of self-operati...
Nov 22, 2022
Learn how analog and mixed-signal (AMS) verification technology, which we developed as part of DARPA's POSH and ERI programs, emulates analog designs. The post What's Driving the World's First Analog and Mixed-Signal Emulation Technology? appeared first on From Silicon To So...
Nov 18, 2022
This bodacious beauty is better equipped than my car, with 360-degree collision avoidance sensors, party lights, and a backup camera, to name but a few....

featured video

Unique AMS Emulation Technology

Sponsored by Synopsys

Learn about Synopsys' collaboration with DARPA and other partners to develop a one-of-a-kind, high-performance AMS silicon verification capability. Please watch the video interview or read it online.

Read the interview online:

featured paper

How SHP in plastic packaging addresses 3 key space application design challenges

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

TI’s SHP space-qualification level provides higher thermal efficiency, a smaller footprint and increased bandwidth compared to traditional ceramic packaging. The common package and pinout between the industrial- and space-grade versions enable you to get the newest technologies into your space hardware designs as soon as the commercial-grade device is sampling, because all prototyping work on the commercial product translates directly to a drop-in space-qualified SHP product.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

The Composite Power Inductance Story

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and Vishay

Power inductor technology has made a huge difference in the evolution of our electronic system designs. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Tim Shafer from Vishay about the history of power inductor technology, how Vishay developed the most compact and efficient power inductor on the market today and why Vishay’s extensive portfolio of composite power inductors might be the best solution for your next embedded system design.

Click here for more information about Vishay Inductors