editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Atmel Takes On the Actual Screen

We’ve talked about Atmel’s touch activities before, both with respect to their controllers and their stylus venture (which also features their controllers). To date, they haven’t been overtly participating in the business of creating actual touchscreens.

But, behind the scenes, they’ve spent the last couple years developing a new projected capacitance (P-CAP) technology called XSense that can be printed onto flexible rolls and used for user interfaces of a much sleeker variety than just your basic flat, brittle screen. In addition to the obvious attractiveness of flexibility, they boast two benefits: linearity and scalability.

Linearity (which also helps scalability) simply means that you can determine where a touch event occurred more accurately. They claim to be able to capture handwriting with a stylus.

Scalability means that they can go to larger screens. This has been an issue with P-CAP technology to some extent. Atmel says that a major limiting factor has been yield, especially cracks in the metal traces. In fact, you’d think that, with a flexible material, cracking might be even more of an issue.

They say they’ve addressed this in a number of ways:

–          They have a proprietary grid pattern (they didn’t say what); apparently this tends to be part of touchscreen secret sauce in general;

–          They have a proprietary manufacturing flow for laying the copper lines that they use (on which they didn’t elaborate, such caginess being part of the “proprietary” thing);

–          And they use redundancy: it’s not that they simply don’t get cracks, but they can tolerate some cracking without it affecting yield.

They currently have requests for sizes up to 32”. They could go bigger – the only limitation is the size of the roll-to-roll machines; they’re not limited by the technology.

One other benefit of the flexible nature of the material is that it can wrap over the edges of the screen, making it possible to create a unit without a bezel (which seems to be something people are always looking for).

You can get more info in their release

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Apr 23, 2024
The automotive industry's transformation from a primarily mechanical domain to a highly technological one is remarkable. Once considered mere vehicles, cars are now advanced computers on wheels, embodying the shift from roaring engines to the quiet hum of processors due ...
Apr 22, 2024
Learn what gate-all-around (GAA) transistors are, explore the switch from fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs), and see the impact on SoC design & EDA tools.The post What You Need to Know About Gate-All-Around Designs appeared first on Chip Design....
Apr 18, 2024
Are you ready for a revolution in robotic technology (as opposed to a robotic revolution, of course)?...

featured video

How MediaTek Optimizes SI Design with Cadence Optimality Explorer and Clarity 3D Solver

Sponsored by Cadence Design Systems

In the era of 5G/6G communication, signal integrity (SI) design considerations are important in high-speed interface design. MediaTek’s design process usually relies on human intuition, but with Cadence’s Optimality Intelligent System Explorer and Clarity 3D Solver, they’ve increased design productivity by 75X. The Optimality Explorer’s AI technology not only improves productivity, but also provides helpful insights and answers.

Learn how MediaTek uses Cadence tools in SI design

featured chalk talk

Dependable Power Distribution: Supporting Fail Operational and Highly Available Systems
Sponsored by Infineon
Megatrends in automotive designs have heavily influenced the requirements needed for vehicle architectures and power distribution systems. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton and Robert Pizuti from Infineon investigate the trends and new use cases required for dependable power systems and how Infineon is advancing innovation in automotive designs with their EiceDRIVER and PROFET devices.
Dec 7, 2023
17,768 views