editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Analysis by Braille

As a technology, JTAG (or IEEE 1149.1) has been leveraged a lot of ways to do a lot of things that may not have been envisioned when it was first developed. Its original mission, however, was rather simple: provide a way to test whether the board connection between two chips was intact. And, while individual components have a way of describing their internal chains via a BSDL file, according to the folks at JTAG Technologies, there is no such simple equivalent for the entire board’s chain.

So if you’re a simple repair shop without access to full design netlists and such, how do you leverage JTAG to confirm whether the connections on a suspect board are intact?

JTAG Technologies has just announced a product called Autobuzz that will let you establish a JTAG chain baseline for a board that you can then use to test other boards. As the name suggests, it can go through and “buzz” out the connections without really knowing much about the board.

It does this by establishing a reference almost blindly from a known good board in “learn” mode. You can then run the tool in “compare” mode on a board in question to determine whether it matches up.

You do need the BSDL files of the individual components (often available online) and you do need to know the order of the devices in the chain, which may be a bit trickier for complex boards, where you can’t visually inspect the traces, but if you’re a serious shop, you will most likely have access to the board schematic, from which the chain order can be easily deduced.

More info on their press release

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 5, 2022
The 30th edition of SMM , the leading international maritime trade fair, is coming soon. The world of shipbuilders, naval architects, offshore experts and maritime suppliers will be gathering in... ...
Jul 5, 2022
By Editorial Team The post Q&A with Luca Amaru, Logic Synthesis Guru and DAC Under-40 Innovators Honoree appeared first on From Silicon To Software....
Jun 28, 2022
Watching this video caused me to wander off into the weeds looking at a weird and wonderful collection of wheeled implementations....

featured video

Demo: Achronix Speedster7t 2D NoC vs. Traditional FPGA Routing

Sponsored by Achronix

This demonstration compares an FPGA design utilizing Achronix Speedster7t 2D Network on Chip (NoC) for routing signals with the FPGA device, versus using traditional FPGA routing. The 2D NoC provides a 40% reduction in logic resources required with 40% less compile time needed versus using traditional FPGA routing. Speedster7t FPGAs are optimized for high-bandwidth workloads and eliminate the performance bottlenecks associated with traditional FPGAs.

Subscribe to Achronix's YouTube channel for the latest videos on how to accelerate your data using FPGAs and eFPGA IP

featured paper

3 key considerations for your next-generation HMI design

Sponsored by Texas Instruments

Human-Machine Interface (HMI) designs are evolving. Learn about three key design considerations for next-generation HMI and find out how low-cost edge AI, power-efficient processing and advanced display capabilities are paving the way for new human-machine interfaces that are smart, easily deployable, and interactive.

Click to read more

featured chalk talk

Enabling the Flow of Data in the World of IoT

Sponsored by Mouser Electronics and YAGEO Group

At the heart of our growing IoT ecosystem are high performance semiconductors, but integrated circuits alone cannot make a successful IoT system. In this episode of Chalk Talk, Amelia Dalton chats with Peter Blais from KEMET and Ryan Wenzelman from Pulse about how passive components are crucial to the development of successful IoT frameworks. They take a closer look at RF, wired and power distribution aspects of IoT system development and investigate how YAGEO Group is advancing innovation in the world of IoT with a wide selection of passive components.

Click here for more information about Pulse Electronics World of IoT