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When analog design discussions turn to simulation, especially when they involve Cadence, one inevitably comes up against the unfortunately-named concept of the “wreal” type. I say “unfortunately” because, pronounced with standard English rules, it’s pronounced “real,” providing no audible distinction from the “real” type. So it’s typically pronounced “double-you-real.” (Or occasionally you’ll hear “wuh-real.”) Yeah, unfortunate.

It’s also difficult to find information on exactly what it is and the context driving its use. It’s easy to learn that it can make some simulation faster, but, somehow, from there you end up diving way down into the nitty gritty of differences between the Verilog-AMS version and Cadence’s version and specific problems being discussed in forums and… well… let’s just try to back up a bit. I was able to talk to Mladen Nizic, a Cadence engineering director, in an attempt to articulate a big-picture statement of the role of the wreal.

First some background. Analog and digital simulators fundamentally work differently. An analog simulator attempts to calculate the state or operating point of a complete circuit. It’s a static, holistic, matrix calculation that is then repeated over very small time increments in an attempt to model continuous time. At any given time, the voltage and current are known for any node.

By contrast, digital simulators model the flow of signals from stimulus to response, driven by events, and they assume the discrete time behavior afforded by a clock. There are no voltages or currents, only 1s and 0s. (And Xs.)

Wreal signals help to bridge the divide between pure analog simulation and full-chip analog/mixed-signal (AMS) simulation. This is necessary for two reasons: AMS simulation must account for the preponderance of digital content, and the size of these chips means that higher simulation performance is needed than would be remotely possible if you tried to simulate the entire chip at an analog level.

With a wreal signal, you can take a voltage or current (but not both) between modules of the full chip. It can operate in a signal-flow fashion, behaving more like a digital signal. This allows it to play nicely in the digital simulation paradigm.

Cadence has made some extensions to the standard wreal:

–          You can typecast signals to/from wreal

–          You can have arrays of wreals

–          You can have multiple drivers on a wreal signal (and the tool will resolve the correct voltage or current)

You still need to do your full analog simulation to make sure your analog module is working properly, but you can now integrate the analog block into your full-chip simulation to make sure that it plays nicely with everything else.

 

When discussions of analog simulation [B1] arise, especially when they involve Cadence, one inevitably comes up against the unfortunately-named concept of the “wreal” type. I say “unfortunately” because, pronounced with standard English rules, it’s pronounced “real,” providing no audible distinction from the “real” type. So it’s typically pronounced “double-you-real.” (Or occasionally you’ll hear “wuh-real.”) Yeah, unfortunate.

It’s also difficult to find information on exactly what it is and the context driving its use. It’s easy to learn that it can make some simulation faster, but, somehow, from there you end up diving way down into the nitty gritty of differences between the Verilog-AMS version and Cadence’s version and specific problems being discussed in forums and… well… let’s just try to back up a bit. I was able to talk to Mladen Nizic, a Cadence engineering director, in an attempt to articulate a big-picture statement of the role of the wreal.

First some background. Analog and digital simulators fundamentally work differently. An analog simulator attempts to calculate the state or operating point of a complete circuit. It’s a static, holistic, matrix calculation that is then repeated over very small time increments in an attempt to model continuous time. At any given time, the voltage and current are known for any node.

By contrast, digital simulators model the flow of signals from stimulus to response, driven by events, and they assume the discrete time behavior afforded by a clock. There are no voltages or currents, only 1s and 0s. (And Xs.)

Wreal signals help to bridge the divide between pure analog simulation and full-chip analog/mixed-signal (AMS) simulation. This is necessary for two reasons: AMS simulation must account for the preponderance of digital content, and the size of these chips means that higher simulation performance is needed than would be remotely possible if you tried to simulate the entire chip at an analog level.

With a wreal signal, you can take a voltage or current (but not both) between modules of the full chip. It can operate in a signal-flow fashion, behaving more like a digital signal. This allows it to play nicely in the digital simulation paradigm.

Cadence has made some extensions to the standard wreal:

          You can typecast signals to/from wreal

          You can have arrays of wreals

          You can have multiple drivers on a wreal signal (and the tool will resolve the correct voltage or current)

You still need to do your full analog simulation to make sure your analog module is working properly, but you can now integrate the analog block into your full-chip simulation to make sure that it plays nicely with everything else.


 [B1]Link to surrender article

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