Feb 10, 2016

Wearable sleeve could improve stroke recovery therapy

posted by Larra Morris

stroke-sleeve.png

When it comes to tools that help stroke victims on their way to recovery, we've seen exoskeletons of sorts to medicine covered clot-busting nanoparticles. But researchers from the University of South Hampton and Imperial College London have something altogether different cooked up: a wireless sleeve that gathers information of how a patient's muscles react during home therapy. As the school tells it, this sleeve, dubbed M-Mark, is the first to bring mechanomyogrpahy sensors (essentially ultra-sensitive microphones that measure muscle contraction) together with tri-axial accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers.

What that means in English is the sleeve is detecting the various inputs and information and using the data to show a patient how much he or she has improved since the beginning of therapy. That info will go to a tablet app that will also give doctors a better look at what's going on in the patient's environment and recovery regimen.
via Engadget

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Feb 10, 2016

The National Archives has released a coloring book of retro patents

posted by Larra Morris

f_16.png

The National Archives of America recently released a free PDF of a coloring book depicting 16 favorite patents from their holdings. Most of the illustrations date back over a century, and they range from the practical (the actual troop lander used on D-Day) to the bizarre (protective goggles for your chickens). While many of the patents never seem to have made it off the ground, maybe this coloring book can be a chance to give them a second look. A mini hammock for trains that hooks onto the seat in front of you would be a perfect fit for movie theaters, and “sandwiched bread”—bread with chunks of meat baked inside—sounds like something today’s Americans would eat right up.
via Mental Floss

Continue reading

Image: The National Archives

Tags :    0 comments  
Feb 10, 2016

Study: Suspects shocked by Taser “more likely” to waive Miranda Rights

posted by Larra Morris

Screen-Shot-2016-02-05-at-9.39.33-AM-640x350.png

A new study says the obvious: suspects' brains are briefly scrambled when they are on the receiving end of a Taser stun gun and its 50,000-volt delivery. But the study, "TASER Exposure and Cognitive Impairment: Implications for Valid Miranda Waivers and the Timing of Police Custodial Interrogations," questions whether suspects who were just shocked have the mental capacity to validly waive their Miranda rights and submit to police questioning.

"TASER-exposed participants resembled patients with mild cognitive impairment, which suggests that not only might our participants be more likely to waive their Miranda rights directly after TASER exposure, but also they would be more likely to give inaccurate information to investigators," reads the study, which appears in the journal Criminology & Public Policy. "Thus, part of our findings implicates a suspect’s ability to issue a valid waiver, whereas another part implicates the accuracy of information he or she might give investigators during a custodial interrogation (e.g., false confessions or statements)."
via Ars Technica

Continue reading 

Image: Christopher Paul

Tags :    0 comments  
Feb 09, 2016

Battery anodes made from pollen are nothing to sneeze at

posted by Larra Morris

pollen-anodes-1.jpg

As our dependence on mobile devices grows and we continue the shift to electric vehicles, there is a need to not only develop better performing batteries but find more accessible and sustainable materials with which to build them. To this end, researchers have now developed an anode for lithium-ion batteries using something those with allergies certainly wouldn't miss: pollen from bees and cattails.
via Gizmag

Continue reading

Image: Purdue University image/Jialiang Tang, Kay J. Hagen

Tags :    0 comments  
Feb 09, 2016

Indian man could be first recorded human fatality due to a meteorite

posted by Larra Morris

iss028e024847_0-640x393.jpg

Indian officials say a meteorite struck the campus of a private engineering college on Saturday, killing one person. If scientists confirm the explosion was due to a meteorite, it would be the first recorded human fatality due to a falling space rock.

According to local reports, a bus driver was killed on Saturday when a meteorite landed in the area where he was walking, damaging the window panes of nearby buses and buildings. Three other people were injured.

On Sunday, various Indian publications, including The Hindu, reported that the chief minister of Tamil Nadu, Jayalalithaa, issued a statement confirming the death: "A mishap occurred yesterday when a meteorite fell in the campus of a private engineering college in Vellore district's K Pantharappalli village." Tamil Nadu is located in southern India, and has a population of more than 70 million people.
via Ars Technica

Continue reading 

Image: NASA

Tags :    0 comments  
Feb 08, 2016

Snow artist stomps awesome fractals with just his two snowshoes

posted by Laura Domela

sierpinski.jpg

Skier and snow artist Simon Beck stomps around in the snow for 11 hours or more to make each of his beautiful fractal snow art masterpieces. He has to walk around 25 or 30 miles to stamp a design of about 100 meters square, using only his two snowshoes. It began as a form of exercise, and has become far more.
via Boing Boing

Continiue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Feb 08, 2016

The people who reportedly never sleep. Ever.

posted by Larra Morris

sleepy_ok_214572k2a.jpg

Vietnamese gentleman Thái Ngọc claims that ever since he suffered a terrible fever in 1973, he hasn't slept a wink. There's also Ines Fernandez who says she's been awake for decades. Of course, these curious individuals and others with similar stories may actually be suffering from a very strange sleep disorder called sleep state misperception (SSM) in which the individuals think they were up all night but actually slept just fine. At Mysterious Universe, Martin J. Clemens looks at SSM and the very scary rare disease called Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), presented as total insomnia that can last the rest of the person's life, which is usually only 18 months or so after the onset of symptoms.
via Boing Boing

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
Get this feed  
« Previous123456...848Next »

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register