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Silicon Without Software is Just Sand

Shifting Left with Imperas and MIT’s Swarm

No one builds a chip without simulation, right? In this week’s Fish Fry, we take a closer look at the value of virtual prototypes to simulate embedded software. Simon Davidmann (CEO – Imperas) and I chat about about why he thinks no one should design embedded software without simulation, and the benefits of using virtual platforms to develop a verification and test environment. Also this week, we investigate a whole new way to design chips, and it’s called Swarm. We examine the details of this new 64-bit architecture developed by MIT, how it could revolutionize the way multicore chips prioritize tasks, and why Swarm could make writing software a whole lot easier.


 

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Links for July 15, 2016

More information about Imperas

ARM Cortex-A72 Models and Virtual Platforms Released by Imperas and Open Virtual Platforms

More information about Swarm

Unlocking Ordered Parallelism with the Swarm Architecture (Whitepaper)

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