editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Maxim in MEMS

A new hat has been tossed into the MEMS ring: Maxim. You may be familiar with them as an analog name, or you might be familiar with Sensor Dynamics. Which was bought by Maxim, and which is now the source of Maxim’s first announcement: a gyroscope aimed at the consumer market. (Read phones and tablets.)

Why a gyroscope? Well, partly because accelerometers have become too inexpensive to be interesting on their own. And because they’re hard: as they said in a conversation I had with them, “get it right and the rest is easy.”

While we’ve noted that gyroscopes have taken longer to gain traction than accelerometers, Maxim sees indoor navigation and optical image stabilization (OIS) as fertile ground for driving gyro usage.

And they’re doing it all themselves. While an accelerometer wasn’t their first device, they will be including one in a 9-axis combo in the future – which means they’re also tackling magnetics. And they say they’ll have a couple more devices specifically aimed at the OIS market shortly.

You can find out more about their initial product in their release

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
May 26, 2019
https://youtu.be/mx1i55BxSTU Made at Embedded Vision Conference (camera xxx) Monday: Alberto and the Origins of the EDA Industry Tuesday: Samsung's 3nm GAA Process Wednesday: I/O Is Faster Than... [[ Click on the title to access the full blog on the Cadence Community si...
May 23, 2019
The Role Of EDA In AI Achieving Effective Verification and Validation of Vehicle E/E Systems – Part 4 Signal Integrity and high-speed design challenges: interview with Mentor’s Todd Westerhoff Designing For The Edge Benefits of a Digitalization Strategy for Electr...
May 23, 2019
Everybody loves webcasts, right? While some may view webcasts as these kids in Ferris Bueller’s class, others love the on-demand technical education available via this popular medium. In an attempt to appeal to the second group, Samtec is pleased to announce a new Chalk...
Jan 25, 2019
Let'€™s face it: We'€™re addicted to SRAM. It'€™s big, it'€™s power-hungry, but it'€™s fast. And no matter how much we complain about it, we still use it. Because we don'€™t have anything better in the mainstream yet. We'€™ve looked at attempts to improve conven...