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Peratech’s force sensitive sensor brings extra functionality to mobile devices

Touch Taiwan, Taipei  – 29 August, 2018. Peratech, a world leader in force-sensing technology has introduced a new force touch sensor for use with mobile devices.  The distributed force array (DFA) sensor uses Peratech’s proprietary quantum tunnelling composite (QTC) technology to provide an array of single point sensors that can be used in conjunction with a position sensor (such as capacitive) to measure force and correlate it with position.

The DFA sensor’s variable input force allows for additional, or new, functionality, such as the ability to navigate device menus and perform other operations via single-finger touch. The DFA sensor also allows for correct haptic feedback when the force reaches a pre-selected activation point, a feature that obviates false touch situations.

In multi-touch applications, the DFA’s proportional force sensing feature can determine the ratio of forces between presses (i.e. harder press to left or right), which can have benefits in improved control, especially in gaming applications.

Peratech’s distributed force array sensors are customizable, cost effective, low power and they unlock the next-generation in HMI experiences, enabling new gestures, simplified interfaces, and endless flexibility. Peratech supplies the DFA sensors with control electronics and software.

About Peratech
Based on patented Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC®) technology, Peratech’s force sensors bring a new dimension to tactile, or force-touch controls. QTC materials change from being an almost perfect insulator to becoming increasingly conductive in proportion to the amount of force applied to them. The materials are very robust and resilient, so that changes in resistance due to even the slightest pressure are both predictable and repeatable over more than a million cycles.

For designers of human machine interfaces (HMI), QTC technology offers unrivalled creative freedom and opportunities for product differentiation in both ergonomics and aesthetics. It makes touch buttons, panels and displays far easier to use.

Peratech’s award-winning, thin and flexible QTC sensors come in single-point, 3D single-touch, and 3D multi-touch versions. They can be used above, below or around rigid or flexible displays, or under metal, plastic, wood, or glass surfaces. The QTC touch experience is intuitive, consistent, precise, durable and reliable, whatever the environment, even when using gloved fingers or in the presence of moisture.

The diverse applications for QTC force sensors include consumer and automotive electronics, smart home systems and appliances, and industrial controls. Over a million devices around the world now employ the technology. Peratech’s custom design and integration service minimises both cost and time-to-market. The company also offers a range of standard products. Peratech Holdco Ltd. is a privately held company based in Richmond, Yorkshire, UK.
Quantum Tunnelling Composite and QTC are registered trademarks of Peratech Holdco Ltd. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

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