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Pasternack Releases 28 New Waveguide Electromechanical Relay Switches Ranging From 5.85 GHz to 40 GHz

New Waveguide Switches Deliver Full Waveguide Performance In C, X, Ku, K and Ka Frequency Bands

IRVINE, Calif. – Pasternack, a leading provider of RF, microwave and millimeter wave products, has introduced 28 new waveguide electromechanical relay switches that offer full waveguide performance covering C, X, Ku, K and Ka frequency bands from 5.85 GHz to 40 GHz. They are ideal for applications that include electronic warfare, electronic countermeasures, microwave radio, VSAT, SATCOM, radar, research and development, space systems and test instrumentation.

Pasternack’s new waveguide electromechanical relay switches are configured for single-pole double-throw (SPDT) operation with latching self-cut-off actuators, TTL logic and position indicators with manual override. A shorting plate can be removed for optional double-pole double-throw (DPDT) operation. All switches incorporate a patented motor drive with arc suppression and include an environmentally sealed, quick-connect DC control connector and mate. The compact package design features integrated waveguide ports with grooved flanges and O-rings included for pressurized operation (up to 30 PSIG). A broad selection of popular waveguide sizes includes WR137, WR112, WR90, WR75, WR62, WR42 and WR28.

These waveguide electromechanical relay switches deliver performance down to 0.01 dB typical insertion loss and up to 105 dB typical isolation. Models exhibit switching speed levels that range from 54 to 76 msec typical, and are available with either +12 or +28 Vdc nominal voltages. Power handling capability is impressive with up to 12 kW CW and 320 kW peak (unpressurized, 10% duty cycle). These rugged designs operate across a temperature range of -40°C to +85°C, are fully weatherized for up to 100% humidity exposure and have an operating life of 250K cycles minimum.

“Designers will find our new broadband waveguide electromechanical switches, with latching self-cut-off actuators and features that include TTL logic and indicators, particularly useful for routing energy in microwave communications, broadcasting and in radar applications. These switches usually require long production lead-times of several months, but Pasternack has all 28 models available and ready to ship today,” said Tim Galla, Product Manager at Pasternack.

Pasternack’s waveguide electromechanical relay switches are in-stock and ready for immediate shipment with no minimum order quantity. For detailed information on these products, please visit https://www.pasternack.com/pages/RF-Microwave-and-Millimeter-Wave-Products/waveguide-electromechanical-relay-switches-up-to-40-ghz.html.

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