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Metal Hybrid PPTC Mini-Breaker with Resettable Thermal Cut-Off Handles Higher Currents in a Smaller Package

Simplifies overtemperature protection for higher-capacity lithium ion polymer and prismatic batteries in mobile, portable devices

CHICAGO, January 22, 2018 — Littelfuse, Inc., the global leader in circuit protection, today introduced the MHP-TAT18 Metal Hybrid PPTC Battery Mini-Breaker with resettable Thermal Cut-Off (TCO). This over-temperature protection device offers a 9VDC rating and a higher current rating than similar products on the market. This new device helps circuit designers meet the battery safety requirements of the higher-capacity lithium ion polymer and prismatic battery cells found in the latest portable, battery-powered consumer products. MHP technology connects a bimetal protector in parallel with a Polymeric Positive Temperature Coefficient (PPTC) device, PPTC acts as a heater and helps keep the bimetal latched until the fault is removed.

Typical applications for the MHP-TAT18 Battery Mini-Breaker Series with resettable TCO include battery cell protection for high-capacity lithium ion polymer and Li-ion prismatic cells used in:

  • Gaming PCs
  • Notebook PCs
  • Ultra-books
  • Tablets
  • Other battery-powered portable devices

“Compared to similar protection devices on the market, MHP-TAT18 Metal Hybrid PPTC Mini-Breakers with thermal cut-off can handle higher currents in a smaller, thinner form factor,” said Amy Chu, product manager, Electronics Business Unit at Littelfuse. “Their welding leads can also be customized to facilitate a customer’s design process.”


The MHP-TAT-18 Metal Hybrid PPTC Mini-Breaker Series with resettable TCO offers these key benefits:

  • High current capacity and low resistance capable of handling the voltages and battery charge rates found in high-capacity lithium ion polymer and prismatic cells.

  • Multiple activation temperature ratings (72°C, 77°C, 82°C, 85°C, 90°C) help to provide resettable and accurate over-temperature protection.

  • Thin, compact form factor (5.8mm x 3.80mm x 1.05mm) facilitates circuit protection in ultra-thin battery pack designs.

Availability
The MHP-TAT Metal Hybrid PPTC Mini-Breaker Series is available in minimum order quantities of 20,000 pieces in boxes. Sample requests may be placed through authorized Littelfuse distributors worldwide. For a listing of Littelfuse distributors, please visit Littelfuse.com.

For More Information
Additional information is available on the MHP-TAT Metal Hybrid PPTC Battery Mini-Breaker Series product page. For technical questions, please contact: Amy Chu, product manager, achu2@littelfuse.com.

About Littelfuse
Founded in 1927, Littelfuse is the world leader in circuit protection with advancing platforms in power control and sensor technologies. The company serves customers in the electronics, automotive and industrial markets with technologies including fuses, semiconductors, polymers, ceramics, relays and sensors. Littelfuse has over 11,000 employees in more than 50 locations throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. For more information, please visit Littelfuse.com.

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