industry news
Subscribe to EE Journal Daily Newsletter
8 + 6 =

LCR Embedded Systems Announces Availability of Pigeon Point Shelf Management for AdvancedTCA Enclosures

Availability of Pigeon Point Adds Even Greater Flexibility to LCR Embedded’s Extensive Portfolio of Design Options

June 19, 2017 – Norristown, PA – LCR Embedded Systems today announced the availability of Pigeon Point shelf management for their customers, further expanding the company’s already extensive portfolio of shelf management options. While this new offering is most relevant to customers seeking to take advantage of the popular, high-performance AdvancedTCA form factor, Pigeon Point shelf management along with the company’s other shelf management options can be designed into other form factors where required.

LCR Embedded’s Pigeon Point Shelf Manager Carrier will be drop-in replaceable both mechanically and electrically with our existing VT014 carrier in our third-generation 6-slot and fourth generation 14-slot AdvancedTCA chassis. These chassis families will be fully dual redundant and feature hot-swappable fan trays in push-and-pull configurations and hot-swappable power entry modules capable of reporting voltage and current on each feed.

LCR Embedded is one of the few companies that supports both Pigeon Point and Vadatech shelf management options, and offer customers chassis designs that support either in the same chassis. In addition, we offer VITA 46.11 shelf management for VPX as an option for customers who prefer to take advantage of that form factor.

“Pigeon Point is an extremely popular shelf management choice for our customers, and we’re delighted to accept opportunities that require it,” said LCR Embedded Systems President David Pearson. “We’re already well known for the variety of unique and reliable solutions we create using standards-based COTS products for all kinds of deployment environments, and this new shelf management offering enhances that reputation. Our engineers are ready to help our customers choose the best of available shelf management and other design options based on requirements.”

The overall responsibility of a system’s shelf manager is to manage and monitor the overall operation of the shelf, including the FRU (field-replaceable unit) population and power, cooling and interconnect resources and their usage, as well as events that may be generated by exception conditions in the shelf. This also includes negotiating assignments for power and interconnect resources when a shelf is powered up or down or when a FRU arrives or departs, and responding to events in the shelf. For instance, in response to temperature exceeding a pre-set value, the shelf manager might raise the fan levels or, if that step is not sufficient, even start powering down FRUs to reduce the heat load in the shelf.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Nov 22, 2017
While DAC is the focal point for the EDA industry, the test community travels in a slightly separate orbit. There are many conferences throughout the year, and around the globe, to help bridge the problems and solutions in academia and the industry. The most prestigious one i...
Aug 03, 2017
Strictly speaking it is not the fifth birthday of Mars Rover Curiosity, since it had been built over many years and its journey from Earth to Mars took months but it was five (Earth) years ago that Curiosity landed on Mars for a 90 day mission. And it is still trundling aroun...
Nov 20, 2017
When faced with the need for more of something, one possible solution is expansion. This could take many forms but one simple way is extending it to be greater in size, such as adding the dining room table leaves to fit more people around the Thanksgiving table. Samtec’s...
Nov 16, 2017
“Mommy, Daddy … Why is the sky blue?” As you scramble for an answer that lies somewhere between a discussion of refraction in gasses and “Oh, look—a doggie!” you already know the response to whatever you say will be a horrifyingly sincere “B...
Nov 07, 2017
Given that the industry is beginning to reach the limits of what can physically and economically be achieved through further shrinkage of process geometries, reducing feature size and increasing transistor counts is no longer achieving the same result it once did. Instead the...