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4D Systems adds smart widgets editor tool and smart objects to Workshop4 PRO GUI development tool

Sydney, Australia: 4D Systems today announced the latest version of its graphical intelligent display integrated development environment (IDE), Workshop4 PRO.

Workshop4 PRO enhances the standard features of the base version of the Workshop4 IDE with options that extend productivity for developing advanced GUIs for embedded applications. The Workshop4 IDE features four different development environments¹  that provide an integrated editor, compiler and linker toolchain from which to create application code and incorporate graphical objects for the complete range of 4D Systems’ display modules and processors.

This latest release of Workshop4 PRO adds a new smart widgets editor tool that assists with the creation of three new smart object types when using the Visi-Genie environment. These are smart gauges, smart knobs and smart sliders, and the editor allows the creation of such objects with up to five layers, these being placed above or below the object’s base layer. The layers can be built up into advanced and visually informative graphical objects, and can also incorporate static images, numbers or text. Such an approach aids developers to add complex and feature-rich user interfaces to an end application in a straightforward and simple manner.

Workshop4 is available for free download from the 4D Systems website. (http://www.4dsystems.com.au/) The Workshop4 PRO features require a one-time license of US$ 79 that can be purchased from 4D Systems. Existing Workshop4 PRO license holders will automatically receive these updates.

1.      A collection of videos that show the new smart editor and objects in use can be found here

https://youtu.be/ix3T6WnGyrA
https://youtu.be/yZPHLiYF_cY
https://youtu.be/grtwckApDxw
https://youtu.be/81cez-Ws4dQ
https://youtu.be/w1PCTq9H3Dw
https://youtu.be/hSvNnPwSxnE
https://youtu.be/HQdGWwzr7Bw

2.      A detailed explanation of these new features can be found here http://www.4dsystems.com.au/product/4D_Workshop_4_IDE/

Notes
*1      The 4D Systems Workshop4 IDE includes four development environments for the user to choose based on application requirements or user skill level.
Designer Environment – The Designer environment allows the user to develop their application using 4D Graphics Language (4DGL). Optimized for the GOLDELOX, PICASO and DIABLO Processors with familiar syntax to common languages such as C.

Vi-Si Environment – The Vi-Si Environment allows the user to use built-in widgets and graphic elements to quickly design the GUI without having to code the graphics. The WYSIWYG editor generates the graphic element 4DGL code for the user.

Vi-Si Genie Environment – Essentially similar to the Vi-Si environment, except the user does not need to code anything at all. Widgets and graphic elements can be connected and assigned functions through simple drop-down menus.
Serial Environment – The serial environment allows the modules to be transformed into serial slave modules to be controlled by any host microcontroller or device with a serial port.

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