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RS Components introduces silicon capacitors that implement disruptive technology for demanding applications

OXFORD, UK, 25 April, 2017 – RS Components (RS), the trading brand of Electrocomponents plc (LSE:ECM), the global distributor for engineers, today launched a new range of silicon capacitors from Murata http://uk.rs-online.com/web/b/ipdia/ that implement an innovative and disruptive technology. The patented technology from Murata Integrated Passive Solutions enables the integration of a wide range of capacitor values in silicon, allowing the range to be used in many applications that require high performance and miniaturisation. Demanding applications targeted by the SiCap range include use in space-constrained designs, especially for ultra-broadband, as well as in RF/microwave and high-temperature applications.

The Murata SiCaps offer improved stability over temperature, voltage and aging performance, exceeding that offered by alternative capacitor technologies, making them ideal for demanding applications where stability and reliability are the main parameters. These can include products and systems requiring extremely reliable components such as in aeronautics, avionics, and automotive markets, as well as for medical implants.

Based on a monolithic structure embedded in a mono-crystalline substrate, the high-density silicon capacitors have been developed using a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) process and use the third (or height) dimension to substantially increase surface area – and therefore capacitance – without increasing the device’s footprint.

The Murata SiCap range includes low-profile devices that are less than 100µm thick for decoupling inside critical-space applications such as for IC decoupling or in MOS-based sensors, broadband modules and RFID products. There are also high-temperature types that can handle up to 250°C with high stability; ultra broadband types for signals up to 60GHz+; and high-reliability medical and automotive-grade capacitors for under the hood applications up to 200°C.

Other key features of the range include shorter interconnect for lower package parasitics, and compatibility with all packaging or assembly configurations including wire bond, bumping, laminates, leadframes and wafer-level chip-scale packaging. 

*Formerly IPDiA, the company was acquired in October 2016 and became Murata Integrated Passive Solutions on 1st April 2017.

About RS Components

RS Components and Allied Electronics are the trading brands of Electrocomponents plc, the global distributor for engineers. With operations in 32 countries, we offer more than 500,000 products through the internet, catalogues and at trade counters to over one million customers, shipping more than 44,000 parcels a day. Our products, sourced from 2,500 leading suppliers, include electronic components, electrical, automation and control, and test and measurement equipment, and engineering tools and consumables.

Electrocomponents is listed on the London Stock Exchange and in the last financial year ended 31 March 2016 had revenues of £1.29bn.

For more information, please visit the website at http://www.rs-online.com.

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