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100V No-Opto Flyback Regulator Delivers 5 Watts in SOT-23 Package & Operates at 150°C

MILPITAS, CA – February 9, 2017 – Linear Technology Corporation announces the H-grade version of the LT8303, a monolithic flyback regulator with guaranteed operation for junction temperatures as high as 150°C. By sampling the isolated output voltage directly from the primary-side flyback waveform, the part requires no opto-isolator or third winding for regulation. The LT8303 operates over a 5.5V to 100V input voltage range, has a 0.45A/150V integrated DMOS power switch and delivers up to 5 watts of output power, making it well suited for a wide range of telecom, datacom, automotive, industrial, medical and military applications.

The output voltage is set with only one external resistor and the transformer turns ratio. Several off-the-shelf transformers, identified in the data sheet, can be used for numerous applications. The LT8303 operates in boundary mode, which is a variable frequency current mode control switching scheme, typically resulting in ±1% output voltage load and line regulation. Boundary mode enables the use of a smaller transformer compared to equivalent continuous conduction mode designs. The high level of integration and the use of low ripple Burst Mode® operation result in a simple to use, low component count and high efficiency application solution for isolated power delivery.

Additional features include output overload and short-circuit protection, 70µA no load operating quiescent current, internal loop compensation along with an accurate enable and undervoltage lockout with hysteresis.

The LT8303H operates over a –40°C to 150°C junction temperature range and is available in a small SOT-23 package. Pricing starts at $3.65 each in 1000-piece quantities. For more information, visit www.linear.com/product/LT8303.

Summary of Features: LT8303H

  • VIN Range from 5.5V to 100V
  • Up to 5 Watts of Output Power
  • Onboard 0.45A, 150V Integrated DMOS Power Switch
  • Off-the-Shelf Power Transformers
  • No Opto-Isolator, LT1431 or Third Winding Required for Voltage Feedback
  • 70µA Quiescent Current
  • Boundary Mode Operation
  • VOUT Set with One External Resistor
  • Internal Loop Compensation
  • Accurate Input Enable & Undervoltage Lockout with Hysteresis
  • Small TSOT Package
  • H Grade: –40°C to 150°C Operating Junction Temp

About Linear Technology

Linear Technology Corporation, a member of the S&P 500, has been designing, manufacturing and marketing a broad line of high performance analog integrated circuits for major companies worldwide for over three decades. The Company’s products provide an essential bridge between our analog world and the digital electronics in communications, networking, industrial, automotive, computer, medical, instrumentation, consumer, and military and aerospace systems. Linear Technology produces power management, data conversion, signal conditioning, RF and interface ICs, µModule® subsystems, and wireless sensor network products. For more information, visit www.linear.com.


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