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Mouse with 3D-printed ovaries gives birth to healthy pups

A mouse with 3D-printed ovaries has successfully given birth to healthy pups, according to a new study. Researchers hope that one day we can use similar techniques to help women who struggle with fertility.

For the study, published today in the journal Nature Communications, the team replaced a mouse’s ovaries with 3D-printed ones. These 3D-printed ovaries held ovarian follicles, or fluid-filled sacs that hold immature eggs. The new ovaries supported the follicles and eggs long enough for the mouse to ovulate, conceive, and give birth. (The study was done by the same Northwestern University team that earlier built a tiny reproductive system in a dish.)

Continue reading at The Verge

Image: Northwestern University

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