fresh bytes
Subscribe to EE Journal Daily Newsletter

An AI ‘nose’ can remember different scents

Russian researchers are using deep learning neural networks to sniff out potential scent-based threats. The technique is a bit dense (as anything with neural nets tends to be), but the gist is that the electronic “nose” can remember new smells and recognize them after the fact.

When the sensor detects a smell, an AI takes over and checks it against a database of known scents for “the closest similar smell determined by the smallest Hamming distance to any know code,” HSE writes. If it can’t find a match, the sensor will identify the scent as being new.

Continue reading at Engadget

Image: Kali Nine LLC

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Aug 21, 2017
Multi-core, coherent SoCs are very complex and verifying their behavior requires a system level perspective that is not easily acquired. As more devices incorporate the coherent multi-core architecture out of competitive necessity, organizations are grappling with the challen...
Aug 18, 2017
Bourbon lovers appreciate their favorite spirits in many forms. Neat. On the Rocks. A favorite mixed drink. An emerging trend in bourbon drinking comes from an unlikely place: Infinite Harvest – an indoor hydroponic vertical farm. Infinite Harvest produces repe...
Aug 09, 2017
Recall for a moment a scene—you’ve probably witnessed something like it at trade shows or on video dozens of times. A robot arm moves purposefully from its rest position. It swoops down on an object—a sphere, say—plucks it up, holds it aloft, replaces it, ...
Aug 03, 2017
Speedcore eFPGAs are embeddable IP that include look-up tables, memories, and DSP building blocks, allowing designers to add a programmable logic fabric to their SoC. The Speedcore IP can be configured to any size as dictated by the end application. The SoC supplier defines t...