ECO Systems

When You Need to Make That One Last Tweak

by Bryon Moyer

OK people, let’s do this. I called this meeting because we have a problem. I know, you might think that tales of what goes on here might not make it out to the golf course and into my ear, but I hear things, OK? And sometimes I don’t like what I hear.

Lately I hear that your designs have been delayed because you keep finding things to change at the last minute. That tells me you’re being sloppy. If you did your verification right up front, you shouldn’t need last-minute changes, right? Am I right?

I’ve also heard that some of you blame marketing for tossing in last-minute feature requests after you’ve completed place and route.

 

Up in ARMs

Processor Optimized IP and Your Next Design

by Amelia Dalton

Fish Fry is physical this week. Yep, we're flexing our SoCs and pulling on our semicodunctor spandex. We may not be running the next design marathon, but we are diving into the world of physical IP. We're talking to Dipesh Patel (ARM) about processor optimization and how ARM is packing a serious punch with their POP IP. Also this week, we're revealing why you don’t have to choose between strictly analog or digital power supplies.

 

Formal in the Cloud

OneSpin’s New Spin on Cloud Computing

by Bryon Moyer

The cloud is the future of everything, they say. You won’t need a computer anymore, they say. Just a phone and ubiquitous connectivity are all you need, they say (you never, ever lose your connection, do you?).

While it hasn’t completely turned our lives upside down yet, yes, the cloud has worked its way into more and more things. And we’ve seen it tip-toe into the world of EDA, although it’s not clear that it’s really sticking so far, and it has some detractors, and there are even those who went to the cloud and then left again.

So was that not such a good idea? Is the cloud for EDA going the way of push technology?

 

Going Local

Local Interconnect Is New. Or Not…

by Bryon Moyer

It snuck up and hit me during a Virtuoso presentation earlier this year by Cadence. It was a reference to “local interconnect.” It was the first such reference I had seen.*

For years I’ve been thinking in terms of silicon structures connected by metal through vias and contact holes. Does this mean that a completely separate set of interconnect was snaking around underneath the metal, where prying eyes (or at least my eyes) can’t see? (Don’t worry… the NSA knows it’s there…)

That wasn’t even half the insult. Here came the really humiliating part: when I started digging around, some folks from Cadence kindly (and without audibly rolling their eyes) forwarded me some older materials on local interconnect (LI). Like… from the 70s.

 

IGLOO2 to You Too

by Amelia Dalton

Fish Fry is headed to the land of programmable logic this week. We're talking FPGA design tools, flash-enhanced FPGAs, and ASIC designs that won't break the bank. We're getting the skinny on Microsemi's new IGLOO2 family from Paul Ekas, chatting about FPGA partitioning with Flexras CEO Hayder Mrbet, and also checking out how Triad Semiconductor can cut your mixed signal ASIC design costs down to a reasonable and career-preserving amount.

 

A Clean-By-Construction Deck

Sage Introduces a DRC Compiler

by Bryon Moyer

So you’ve spent many months on a chip design project that’s winding down. Layout is done, or at least you hope it’s done, and it’s time to make sure that you did it right. (Yes, I know… most designs today will involve many people doing different things, so the “you” here is intended to refer collectively to all of you.)

That means it’s time to run your design rule checks (DRCs). And as the computer hums away on your DRC deck (presumably so-called because at one time it was a deck of Hollerith cards), inspecting every nook and cranny (you hope) for violations, did you ever wonder where that deck came from?

 

I Spy RTL

Margaritas, SpyGlass, and the Newest in RTL Signoff

by Amelia Dalton

Fish Fry is watching you. We know all about that lunch. The one in the break room fridge. The one you thought was yours but wasn’t, and you ate it anyway. We also know that you kinda fudged that last deadline when it came close to crunch time, and let’s not even talk about those cheat codes... OK, no - we're not really watching you but we are talking about a whole other kind of spying in this week's Fish Fry. Yep, we’re talking about spying into your RTL design. My guest this week is none other than Mike Gianfagna (Atrenta) and we’re gonna ask him about RTL signoff, spyglasses, and spicy margaritas.

 

Powering Down the First Derivative

Teklatech Softens Pulses

by Bryon Moyer

When we first start learning math (or, for those across the pond, “maths” – however many of them there are), we learn about amounts. Simple numbers that describe how much of something there is at a given time. But when we grow up, we start to think about how fast those numbers change, and we enter the bewildering world of calculus and the first derivative. (Through the unfortunate mechanism of epsilons and deltas, which immediately confounds all but the most analytical folks and gives the whole thing a bad name… but I digress.)

A few years ago we took a look at Teklatech’s Power Shaping technology. Originally associated with their floorplanning focus, it evolved to be their primary purpose: to reduce the amplitude of noise on the power rail. They say that such “rail-aware” analysis is now a standard thing. So we’re done, right?

 

Let's Get This DAC Party Started

Bits and Pieces from the 2013 Design Automation Conference

by Amelia Dalton

Maybe it was the heat, maybe was the sheer number of processor guys strolling in from the greater Austin area, or maybe it was the BBQ. I’m not exactly sure what it was, but this year’s Design Automation Conference and Expo was livelier and more energetic than we’ve seen in years, and Fish Fry is taking you straight to center of the serious (and not so serious) design automation action. First, we talk about DAC with Tom Anderson (Breker) and ask him about SoC verification and more importantly, what set the Breker booth apart from the rest of the pack on the expo floor this year. Next, we chat with Anupam Bakshi, CEO of Agnisys about cavemen, automatic code generation, and booth babes…or, uh, I mean, temporary technical representatives.

 

#50DAC

Technology History Trending in Austin

by Kevin Morris

The 50th annual Design Automation Conference (DAC) in Austin Texas is a landmark event. It is remarkable to think that engineers have been using computer-aided design for electronic systems for more than half a century now. In honor of DAC’s 50th anniversary, there is a small museum in the front of the show with memorabilia (pronounced “swag”) spanning the five-decade history of the conference. Among the T-shirts, coffee mugs, backpacks, and other era-appropriate giveaways, there are photo scrapbooks of years past and samples of conference proceedings. There is even a copy of the proceedings from the very first DAC - “1964 ACM/IEE Design Automation Conference” - held in Atlantic City, NJ June 24-26 1964.

 

EDA for Sensor Fusion

Movea’s SmartFusion Studio

by Bryon Moyer

When you’re building something that’s never been built before, you’ve got a lot more work in store for you than you would if you merely satisfied yourself with what’s already been done. There are lots of unknowns, and you’ve got to explore and solve them before you can proceed.

If you’re doing an everyday human-sized project in your workshop to build something using unusual materials, you have to figure out what adhesives or other fasteners will work, whether any of the materials might interact (aluminum touching iron?), whether paints will cover adequately… You might have to try different variants or different formulations until you get something that performs well.

 

Timing is Everything

The Trouble with Timing Closure in FPGA Design

by Kevin Morris

Timing closure is the not-so-fine-print of FPGA design.

PowerPoint presentations paint the process as almost trouble free. FPGA design is simple, right? You just code up some HDL, drop it into the vendor-supplied tool suite, press the magic button - and zzzzzip! Your dev board will spring to life - blinking LEDs and detecting button presses with glee and aplomb. You even try it with the supplied sample code. Yep, sure enough. It’s like microwaving a burrito. Pop off the wrapper, run it through the process, and it’s ready to eat.

Emboldened, you embark on your first “real” design work. This takes some time, of course. You select from a nice assortment of pre-designed IP blocks, stitch them together with the vendor-supplied whizzy-GUI tool, and things are lookin’ good. You run that portion of your design through the tools and - still on track - except for a couple of things you hooked up wrong between blocks, the miracle of field-programmable custom logic is your apple.

 

Will Electrical and Mechanical Domains Merge?

A Conversation About Mentor’s FloTHERM XT Raises the Question

by Bryon Moyer

Electronics power density is approaching that of a nuclear reactor core. But don’t worry – it’s still an order of magnitude less than that of a rocket nozzle.

This was the eye-opening “got your attention?” snippet in a presentation launching Mentor’s new FloTHERM XT tool.

The idea of this particular tool is to make life easier for PCB and system designers as they manage heat by bringing together EDA and MDA (Mechanical Design Automation) data early in the conceptual stage of a design to allow earlier, faster thermal simulation.

 

The Rise of MathWorks, the Fall of EDA

Two Routes Into FPGA Tools

by Kevin Morris

Since Einstein, we’ve come to realize that more and more things depend on relativity. This is true not just in physics, but also in more human arenas like marketing and sales. Our perception of something like - FPGA tool prices, for example - might depend on whether we’re coming from an EDA background - which says that high-quality design tools cost tens- to hundreds-of-thousands of dollars for a license, or from a mass-market software background - which says that software goes for tens to hundreds of dollars a pop.

Both of these are valid perspectives. EDA companies have to charge what they do to fund the enormous engineering effort required to develop highly-sophisticated tools for a relatively small audience. Developing a good EDA tool is a much more complex undertaking than, say, the latest version of Angry Birds, and the cost of that complexity is amortized over an audience thousands of times smaller. The result - one piece of software might cost $5 and one might cost $500,000.

 

FPGA Tools, Marketing Malarkey Goggles, and More

by Amelia Dalton

FPGA Tools - can't live with them, can't design without them. This week's Fish Fry is about ending the first part of that meme and how Xilinx is hoping to make our design tool experience a whole bunch easier. My guest is Tim Vanevenhoven (Senior Marketing Manager - Xilinx) and we're going to chat about design abstraction, IP integration, and how the FPGA tool community is working together to provide more powerful, easier to use solutions. Also this week, I give a sneak preview of my previously top-secret, special-purpose augmented reality glasses - and I'll tell you how I plan to use them to cut through the marketing fog at the upcoming Design West show. Hmmm... Maybe I should do a Kickstarter project to get these guys into volume production...

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