Jun 29, 2016

Rats feel empathy for other rats, unless they're on antidepressants

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2016-06-28_at_11.35.47_PM.png

A 2011 study found that when a free rat came in contact with a rat trapped in a container, the free rat was empathically motivated to release the distressed rat from its cell. But a new study, published in Frontiers in Psychology, noted that a rat put in a similar scenario but given an anti-anxiety medication, was less likely to free its trapped peer.

Both studies were led in part by Peggy Mason, professor of neurobiology from the University of Chicago. In the most recent study, Mason discovered that rats given the antidepressant midazolam were less likely to free a fellow rat from a locked compartment, but would, however, open the same restrainer device when it contained chocolate instead.
via The Verge

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Jun 29, 2016

Pill-dispensing "robot" knows who you are

posted by Larra Morris

pillo-3.jpg

Imagine a pill-dispensing, health-focused version of Amazon Echo, and you'll get an idea of what Pillo is designed to be. Utilizing facial and voice recognition software, the internet-connected device can reportedly recognize multiple family members on sight, giving them their daily medication while also addressing their health and wellness-related inquires.
via Gizmag

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Jun 29, 2016

5,000-year-old pay stub shows that ancient workers were paid in beer

posted by Larra Morris

00121754001_h-800x533-640x426.jpg

In the ancient Mesopotamian city of Uruk, residents enjoyed many benefits of modern life. The city, located in modern-day Iraq, was home to massive ziggurats that would rival any of today's modern skyscrapers for sheer monumentality. People in Uruk exchanged goods for money, played board games, and sent each other letters on clay tablets using a writing system called cuneiform. They were also paid for their labor in beer. We know this because pay stubs were incredibly common documents at the time, and one such pay stub (pictured above) is now in the possession of the British Museum.

Writing in New Scientist, Alison George explains what's written on the 5,000-year-old tablet: "We can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning 'ration,' and a conical vessel, meaning 'beer.' Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker."
via Ars Technica

Continue reading 

Image: Trustees of the British Museum

Tags :    0 comments  
Jun 28, 2016

A section of Route 66 will become America's first public solar road

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2016-06-27_at_11.00.38_PM.png

A section of America’s most famous highway is going green, The Christian Science Monitor reports. The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) plans to create the nation’s first solar-powered public road by lining a portion of Route 66 with energy-generating photovoltaic pavers. The pavers will be installed near a rest stop in Conway, Missouri, where they’ll hopefully produce enough electricity to power the facilities and fund future projects.
via Mental Floss

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Jun 28, 2016

Tour de France officials will scan participants' bikes to check for cheaters

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2016-06-27_at_10.57.18_PM.png

Following a prominent cheating incident earlier this year, participants in the upcoming Tour de France will have to have their bikes scanned for concealed electric motors and batteries. Cycling officials plan to conduct between 3,000 and 4,000 tests, the Union Cycliste Internationale said today. This technology has been used at multiple other races, but this will be the first time it is deployed at the Tour de France.

"Technological fraud tests" rely on a tablet, case, adapter, and software to scan a bike, its wheels, frame, groupset, and other components in under a minute. The scanner creates a magnetic field and then allows the tablet to detect interruptions to that field. The UCI says those disruptions often come from a motor, magnet, or battery. If they’re detected, officials will dismantle the bike and inspect it.
via The Verge

Continue reading 

Image: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

Tags :    0 comments  
Jun 27, 2016

Sweden debuts the world's first 'electric highway'

posted by Larra Morris

q-100.jpg

Much like an electrified railroad, the 1.2 mile stretch has a series of wires hanging overhead that a pantograph-equipped truck can connect to. Then, the vehicle can deactivate its fuel-burning engine and coast along on that delicious, dirt-cheap electricity, switching back when the wires stop.

Scania official Claes Erixon has said that the project is "one important milestone on the journey towards fossil-free transport."
via Engadget

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Jun 27, 2016

Giraffe-like robot walks, climbs, and loads the dishwasher

posted by Larra Morris

 Screen_Shot_2016-06-26_at_7.57.44_PM.png

Boston Dynamics writes on YouTube that the little guy can last 90 minutes per charge and weighs in at only 55 pounds. To assist with mobility and navigation, it's equipped with depth cameras and sensors in its limbs. The video above shows the SpotMini's ability to move around an obstacle-filled space, climb stairs, and prance. And with its new neck, the robot can be made to grab and move objects around, which comes in handy for loading the dishwasher and fetching a beer.
via Mental Floss

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
Get this feed  
« Previous123456...885Next »

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register