May 03, 2016

Software update destorys $286 million Japanese satellite

posted by Larra Morris

hitomi-879x485.jpg

The Japanese X-ray telescope Hitomi has been declared lost after it disintegrated in orbit, torn apart when spinning out of control. The cause is still under investigation but early analysis points to bad data in a software package pushed shortly after an instrument probe was extended from the rear of the satellite. JAXA, the Japanese space agency, lost $286 million, three years of planned observations, and a possible additional 10 years of science research.
via Hack a Day

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
May 03, 2016

This app lets parents read their children bedtime stories in virtual reality

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2016-05-02_at_11.15.25_PM.png

Whether they travel a lot or just pull the occasional late shift at the office, it’s difficult for parents to make sure they’re at home to tuck in their kids every night. That can be tough on both parents and children who've grown accustomed to the comforting ritual of the goodnight hug or bedtime story. But now, Samsung is developing a new app that lets parents and children reunite for bedtime stories in virtual reality.

The Verge reports that Bedtime VR Stories by Samsung will let parents and children go on a virtual journey together. The app combines elements of the traditional bedtime story—words appear on screen, and parents can read them aloud—with games and animation. The child doesn’t just passively listen to their parent read a story. Instead, they travel with them through an animated world of animals, dinosaurs, and robots, and are asked to interact with their environment in different ways (for instance, by counting the animals on screen).
via Mental Floss

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
May 02, 2016

Bitcoin creator unmasked: Australian computer scientist Craig Wright says he is Satoshi Nakamoto

posted by Laura Domela

bitcoin.jpeg

After years of speculation, the search for the elusive creator behind the Bitcoin cryptocurrency may have reached a conclusion.

Revealing his identity to the BBC, among a handful of other publications, Australian entrepreneur and computer scientist Dr. Craig Wright today confirmed rumors that first surfaced in December, stating that he is, in fact, Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonymous individual who introduced Bitcoin to the world way back in 2009.
via Venture Beat

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
May 02, 2016

New data suggests you only have five close friends

posted by Larra Morris

kuez31dhfjxgzcxatog6.jpg

You’ve probably heard of Dunbar’s Number which suggests that human beings can only maintain meaningful relationships with between 100 to 230 other people, and that number is typically 150. It’s been demonstrated to hold true in all kinds of situations—from ancient armies to big business.

But you might not know that Robin Dunbar, the anthropologist behind the number, has since also suggested that those relationships are layered, like an onion. He argues that people typically have five ultra-close relationships, then 10 slightly less cozy companions, 35 at more distance, and then 100 in an outer circle. Now he and follow researchers have published data that appears to lend weight to the theory.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
May 02, 2016

Scientists create the world’s smallest thermometer out of DNA

posted by Larra Morris

dnaheader.jpg

The world’s smallest thermometer is 20,000 times smaller than a single human hair. Oh, and it’s made out of genetic material.

Researchers from the Laboratory of Biosensors and Nanomachines at the University of Montreal report that they’ve created a thermometer out of DNA in a recent article in the journal Nano Letters.
via Mental Floss

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Apr 30, 2016

UC Irvine accidentally invents a battery that lasts forever

posted by Larra Morris

d2tkkj1jfm0n25.cloudfront.net.jpg

What do Viagra, popsicles, Corn Flakes, Ivory soap, the kitchen microwave, and champagne have in common? They were all discovered by accident. Add ultra-long-lasting nanowire batteries to that list, thanks to a team of researchers at the University of California Irvine. The average laptop battery is rated anywhere from 300 to 500 charge cycles – completely full to completely empty to completely full again – longer if you don’t use it all up before recharging. The UCI nanobattery endured 200,000 charge cycles over three months “with 94–96% average Coulombic efficiency.” It was effectively still brand new at the end of the experiment.
via The Drive

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Apr 29, 2016

German city designs traffic lights for oblivious pedestrians

posted by Larra Morris

ausburger_trafficlight-ed.jpg

The German city of Augsburg has taken a novel approach to dealing with pedestrians too buried in their smartphone screens to notice traffic signals. By embedding flashing red LEDs in the sidewalks at busy pedestrian crossings, the city has moved those signals right into their line of sight.
via Engadget

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Get this feed  
« Previous123456...874Next »

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register