Mar 31, 2014

Before the internet

posted by Laura Domela

before_the_internet.png

 

Tags : internet, comics,    1 comment  
Mar 31, 2014

The amazing ping pong robot was a fake

posted by Laura Domela

pingpongfake.jpeg

Well — you guys were right. As it turns out, it was actually a pair of animators who fooled the internet.

Not sure what we’re talking about? Last month, the [Kuka Robot Group] put out a highly polished video showing an industrial robot playing table tennis against the apparent world champion of the sport — it was extremely well done and entertaining to watch, but unfortunately… also fake. Weeks after the first [Kuka] video came out, someone named [Ulf Hoffmann] released another video, a small table tennis playing robot that looked almost feasible.
via Hackaday

Continue reading 

Tags : robots, sports,    0 comments  
Mar 31, 2014

The floating house

posted by Larra Morris

floating-house-01.jpg

We've always fancied owning our very own luxury GearCulture yacht, but now we're thinking we want one of these instead. The Floating House sports a couple of stunning bedrooms, bathrooms, living room and a kitchen. Oh, and a mighty, mighty large pool out back. And front. It sure would be a swell place to have the office.
via Gear Culture

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Mar 31, 2014

"Mini hearts" on veins could be used to treat circulatory problems

posted by Larra Morris

miniheart-1.jpg

When someone has chronic venous insufficiency, it means that because of faulty valves in their leg veins, oxygen-poor blood isn't able to be pumped back to their heart. The George Washington University's Dr. Narine Sarvazyan has created a possible solution, however – a beating "mini heart" that's wrapped around the vein, to help push the blood through.

The mini heart takes the form of a cuff of rhythmically-contracting heart tissue, made by coaxing the patient's own adult stem cells into becoming cardiac cells. When one of those cuffs is placed around a vein, its contractions aid in the unidirectional flow of blood, plus it helps keep the vein from becoming distended. Additionally, because it's grown from the patient's own cells, there's little chance of rejection.
via Gizmag

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Mar 30, 2014

Contact lenses with infrared vision? Ultra-thin graphene opens up the possibilities

posted by Laura Domela

infrared-vision.jpg

Seeing the infrared spectrum has a number of applications that go beyond the nighttime war games glamorized in adventure flicks. Doctors can use the wavelengths to monitor blood flow, and civil engineers can use them to identify heat or chemical leaks. And they may be able to do so without the clunky goggles seen on film.

Researchers at the University of Michigan, led by electrical engineer Zhaohui Zhong, have devised a way to capture the infrared spectrum without requiring the cooling that makes infrared goggles so cumbersome. The method uses the trendy nanomaterial graphene and works on a device smaller than a pinky nail.
via Singularity Hub

Continue reading 

Tags : materials,    0 comments  
Mar 30, 2014

Case study: Sir Ernest Shackleton and the Trans-Antarctic Expedition

posted by Laura Domela

Shackleton-small1.png

This is the first in a series of case studies on adventurers, athletes and historical men and women who pushed their limits and challenged the status quo in order to the impossible and do things no one had ever done before. Enjoy.

Ernest Shackleton was one of the main polar explorers of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. He led three expeditions to the Antarctic, including a disastrous expedition which saw his ship get trapped in ice before being crushed and sinking. Overcoming horrific obstacles and defeating all the odds, Shackleton led all his men to safety, and the expedition became known as one of the most most epic feats of endurance and leadership of all time.
via Impossible

Continue reading 

Tags : people,    0 comments  
Mar 28, 2014

These sand castles are actually castles carved on grains of sand

posted by Larra Morris

sandcastle.gif

Anyone can build a castle with sand, but can you build a castle on sand? Artist and photographer Vik Muniz collaborated with MIT researcher Marcelo Coelho to engrave a castle onto a single granule of sand.

The process brilliantly combines both high and low tech in the history of imagemaking. Muniz sketches the castle using a camera obscura, a pre-photography tool that helps him to render a 3D object into a 2D image.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Mar 28, 2014

Scientists just took a major step toward making life from scratch

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2014-03-27_at_9.51.26_PM.png

Synthetic biology has come a long way in recent years. In the last two decades alone, scientists have been able to go from synthesizing the genome of a relatively small virus, Hepatitis C, to creating what researchers refer to as the "first synthetic cell" from a unicellular organism. Yet until recently, researchers had been incapable of constructing one of the most emblematic symbols of our own genetic makeup: the eukaryotic chromosome. Now, a team of scientists has announced that the age of the synthetic chromosome is upon us, as a study published in Science today reveals how the group was able to construct a yeast chromosome from scratch — an experiment that allowed the team to make fully functional "designer yeast."
via The Verge

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Mar 28, 2014

This clock automatically writes the time on an Etch A Sketch

posted by Larra Morris

clock.jpg 

This ingenious clock by Instructables member dodgey99 turns the knobs on an Etch A Sketch to write the time, then flips over to erase the markings and update.

First, he adapted a pre-existing body of code that used stepper motors to write random lines on an Etch A Sketch. He carefully rewrote this code so that it would not only compose specific lines, but reset the stylus on an analog device. Then he used pulleys to connect the knobs to a pair of overpowered stepper motors mounted a frame of acrylic sheets. An Arduino electronic controller directs the motors.
via Neatorama

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Mar 27, 2014

An unexpected discovery in the brains of autistic children

posted by Laura Domela

brain-patches3.jpg

Nobody knows what causes autism, a condition that varies so widely in severity that some people on the spectrum achieve enviable fame and success while others require lifelong assistance due to severe problems with communication, cognition, and behavior. Scientists have found countless clues, but so far they don’t quite add up. The genetics is complicated. The neuroscience is conflicted.

Now, a new study adds an intriguing, unexpected, and sure-to-be controversial finding to the mix: It suggests the brains of children with autism contain small patches where the normally ordered arrangement of neurons in the cerebral cortex is disrupted. “We’ve found locations where there appears to be a failure of normal development,” said Eric Courchesne, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego and an author of the study, which appears today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
via Wired

Continue reading 

Tags : brain,    0 comments  
Get this feed  

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register