Apr 17, 2014

A patient’s bizarre hallucination points to how the brain identifies places

posted by Larra Morris

megevand-brain-study.jpg

Dr. Pierre Mégevand was in the middle of a somewhat-routine epilepsy test when his patient, a 22-year old man, said Mégevand and his medical team looked like they had transformed into Italians working at a pizzeria — aprons and all. It wasn’t long, the patient said, before the doctors morphed back into their exam room and business-casual attire. But that fleeting hallucination — accompanied by earlier visions of houses, a familiar train station and the street where the patient grew up — helped verify that a certain spot, in a certain fold in the brain, is a crucial node in the brain’s process of recognizing places.
via Wired

Continue reading

Image: Mégevand et.al.

Tags :    0 comments  
Apr 17, 2014

3D printing drastically reduces development costs of blood recycling machine

posted by Larra Morris

brightwave-hemosep-3d-printed.jpg

During surgery, patients' blood is often "spilt." Such blood can be returned to the body, so long as it has been properly processed to ensure that it is not tainted. The Brightwave Hemosep autotransfusion machine can do this – and its prototyping costs have been cut by 96 percent via 3D printing.
via Gizmag

Continue reading

Image: Stratasys

Tags :    0 comments  
Apr 16, 2014

Bioengineers inject cockroaches with DNA nanobots

posted by Laura Domela

cockroach.jpg

It seems to be universal knowledge that if were ever invaded by aliens, cockroaches would most likely survive. Cockroaches will probably survive anything apocalyptic as proven in Fallout 3 after having to fight off those oversized nightmares. However, scientists thought it would be a swell idea to inject cockroaches with DNA nanobots.

The nanobots are also called “origami robots” because they fold and unfold strands of DNA. The cockroaches should be able to function like little computer and perform various simple tasks. The DNA nanobots have been programmed to interact with each other and move around inside of the cockroaches. So far as we can tell, these super cockroaches are meant for dispensing drugs.
via Geekosystem

Continue reading 

image via Jeremy Page

Tags : robots, future tech,    0 comments  
Apr 16, 2014

A list of people who disappeared mysteriously

posted by Laura Domela

This is a list of people who disappeared mysteriously, and whose current whereabouts are unknown or whose deaths are not substantiated, as well as a few cases of people whose disappearance was notable and remained mysterious for a long time, but was eventually explained.

via Boing Boing

Tags : people, random,    0 comments  
Apr 16, 2014

How well I understand orbital mechanics (xkcd)

posted by Laura Domela

orbital_mechanics.png

Who says video games aren’t educational? This low-key endorsement from Randall Munroe at xkcd (who is a former NASA roboticist) will probably do more for the game Kerbal Space Program than all the splashy ads they could buy.  
via Neatorama and xkcd 

Tags : video games, physics, comics,    0 comments  
Apr 16, 2014

Google's new modular phone may be the last you'll need to buy

posted by Laura Domela

ara-01-660x495.jpg

At the Project Ara Developer’s Conference in Santa Clara, California, the moment of unveiling was a bit of a letdown. When project lead Paul Eremenko got ready for the big reveal — finally showing off Google’s vision for a modular phone with working, user-interchangeable components — he had to dampen expectations from the enthusiastic crowd. “You should temper your applause,” he warned, explaining that the device had been damaged the previous day. “We did crack the screen, and the phone doesn’t quite boot.” A disappointment, sure, but it did little to actually temper anything.

Project Ara is Google’s attempt to reinvent the cellphone as we know it. Instead of a slab of glass and metal that you have no ability to upgrade, save for buying a new device, it’s an attempt to launch a phone where all of the main components are interchangeable via modules that click in and out, attaching via electro-permanent magnets. Despite being highly customizable, it will only come in three main sizes, helping to eliminate the kind of device fragmentation that currently plagues Android. Google plans to roll out a “gray model,” a very basic device that costs as little as $50, as well as higher-end handsets that could go for as much as $500 and up. The former will be released first — around this time next year if all goes according to plan — and will likely be a smaller, Wi-Fi-only version. This bare-bones model will be followed by the higher-end ones eventually. But Google’s initial objective is to ramp up a hardware ecosystem that moves at the same pace as the software it runs.
via Wired

Continue reading 

Photo: Norman Chan/Tested.com

Tags : smartphones,    0 comments  
Apr 16, 2014

Google applies for patent on contact lens camera

posted by Laura Domela

contactcam.jpg

Google's research department is cranking out ideas for eye-worn electronics. Just a few months ago saw the company's patent application for a glucose sensor in a contact lens — now it is looking at integrating a full-on camera.

The application, uncovered by Patent Bolt, is one of many recent ones relating to methods for adding chips and components of various kinds to contact lenses. In the illustrations, a tiny camera sensor is seen just below where the eye's iris would be, and various accompanying electronic bits are connected.
via NBC News

Continue reading 

Apr 16, 2014

Watch five Giant Cat excavators play the world's biggest game of Jenga

posted by Larra Morris

Twenty-seven wooden blocks weighing 600 pounds each? That's no regular game of Jenga—that's a job for a team of five giant, yet agile, Cat excavators and telehandlers to take on. Just some machines having fun.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
Apr 16, 2014

Scientists are studying evolutionary concepts with robot mice

posted by Larra Morris

robots-mice33.jpg

Studying evolution is tricky -- it's a process that happens over countless generations and thousands of years, but the men tasked with studying it live less than a century. Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology have found one way around the problem: robots. OIST's Dr. Stefan Elfwing has been using small, rodent-like robots to study the long-term effects of disparate mating strategies, observing the evolution of the simulated species for over 1,000 generations. Two groups of robo-mice were programmed to forage for food (battery-powered recharge stations) and to find a mate (trade data through an embedded IR port), with each group following a different mating strategy. Robots dubbed "foragers" would focus on recharging, only mating if it didn't get in the way of feeding, while "trackers" would actively seek mates and go without charging if it increased their chances of linking up IR ports.
via Engadget

Continue reading 

Image: OIST

Tags :    0 comments  
Apr 15, 2014

Google Glass now available to all for limited time

posted by Laura Domela

googleglass.jpg

Google has been peddling its Google Glass wearable device for a while now and so far, to be able to buy one, you had to be invited. Even once you were invited, you still needed to cough up the $1500. If you have been dreaming about becoming a Glass user, but didn't know anyone who could invite you, today is your day.

Google confirmed a few days ago that on April 15 anyone would be able to buy Glass without having an invite. The catch to thisspecial deal is that it is for a limited number of spots open in the Glass Explorer program. Google offers no details on exactly how many spots it is trying to fill.
via SlashGear

Continue reading

Image: SlashGear

Tags : gadgets,    0 comments  
Get this feed  

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register