iWatch, You Speculate Incessantly

by Bruce Kleinman, FSVadvisors

I held out as long possible before writing anything iWatch related. The irony is that I am iFatigued with everyone iGuessing about an iUnnanounced product, and yet here I am contributing to the noise. ¡iCaramba! The proverbial last straw: I read a piece comparing Microsoft’s unannounced wearable to Apple’s unannounced wearable. OMG.

And AFTER deciding to write this piece—but before I could start—another piece appeared with the declarative headline “Here’s Everything We Know About the iWatch.” And because I cannot make up stuff this good, apparently the things we KNOW include:

 

The Bozo Coefficient

Why Everyone Around You Is An Idiot

by Jim Turley

If you sit and watch a busy street for any length of time, you’ll see a surprising number of bone-headed drivers, bicyclists, and even pedestrians. People walk straight into lampposts because they’re staring down at their phones. Drivers pull U-turns in the middle of traffic, run red lights, or head the wrong way down a one-way street. And bicyclists – especially those ones with Spandex logowear – weave in and out, oblivious to all traffic laws, as well as to basic self-preservation.

When did the world get populated with such bozos?

It has been ever thus. You and I sit at the far right edge of the Gaussian distribution (that’s “bell curve” for the less mathematically minded) for intelligence, right? Those other people? Not so much. It takes a lot of below-average people to average-out the better examples of humanity such as ourselves.

 

The Sun Sets on Moore’s Law

Are FPGAs Harbingers of a New Era?

by Kevin Morris

The title may have put you off. In fact, it probably should have. After all, most of us in the press/analyst community have - at one time or another during the past decade or two - been walking around like idiots wearing sandwich signs saying, “The End is Nigh!” And, we got just about as much attention as we deserved. “Yawn, very interesting, press and analysts, and now back to planning the next process node…”

It gets worse. Predicting that Moore’s Law will end is pretty much a no-brainer. It’s about as controversial as predicting that a person will die… someday. There is obviously some point at which the laws of physics and the reality of economics will no longer allow us to double the amount of stuff we put on a single chip every two years. The question is - when will we reach that point, and how will we know we are there?

 

Multi-Patterning Rollout

What’s Coming When?

by Bryon Moyer

As we continue to try (and succeed at) stuffing more circuity into a tiny space than physics allows without great cleverness, we are drifting more and more into the use of multiple patterning. We’ve looked at this a number of times, starting with the simplistic view of litho-etch-litho-etch (LELE) approach and then digging deep into the far less intuitive self-aligned (or spacer-assisted) double-patterning (SADP).

As we’ve mentioned here and there, these technologies are, to some extent, in production – and more is coming. What’s a bit confusing is what’s coming when and why. Today’s musings attempt to sort that out.

But before we do that, let’s do a quick review (with more details available in the prior pieces linked above). Multiple patterning is a trick we play so that we can place features closer together than can be done with a single exposure. The solution? Split the mask pattern in half and do two exposures.

 

FPGA Fiesta!

Lattice's iCE40 Ultra and Xilinx at
X-fest 2014

by Amelia Dalton

Bienvenido a Fish Fry! Welcome to this week’s field programmable Fish Frying festivities. First to join the podcastin' party is Joy Wrigley from Lattice Semiconductor. Joy and I discuss how FPGAs are breaking into the IoT scene and why low power will make all the difference in tomorrow’s mobile designs. Joining the fun next is Barrie Mullins from Xilinx. Barrie and I chat about how Vivado is playing a bigger role in this year's X-fest and why this conference isn't just for FPGA designers.

 

Enabling Creepy… and Cool

Movidius Camera Processor Helps Drones As Well As Doctors

by Jim Turley

Video surveillance, CCTV, camera-toting drones, cellphone video, stoplight cameras – they’re everywhere! It seems as though no public space isn’t being recorded, filed, uploaded, and possibly analyzed for malfeasance. The common factor in all these scenarios is digital cameras.

And what do all digital cameras need? Lots of storage, lots of bandwidth, and lots of processing power. Grabbing frame after frame of unrefined, uncompressed video isn’t interesting. You need to massage the video before it’s useful. That means some combination of white balance, edge detection, smoothing, compressing, artefact reduction, and possibly image recognition. That’s a lot of work on a lot of pixels, in very little time.


Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register