The Internet of Industry

Broadcom Puts the I in Industrial IoT

by Amelia Dalton

In this week’s Fish Fry, we’re tackling another side of the multi-sided IoT die - industrial internet. My guest Brian Bedrosian (Broadcom) is here to chat with us about the industrial internet movement, and where Industrial IoT is headed. He’ll also tell us what he thinks the odds look like for another Golden State Warrior NBA title championship next season! Also this week, we take a closer look at a new patent recently granted to Boeing that may make our long sought dreams of a “real” transformer to life.


Imagination Imagines a 5G Future

Will Fifth-Generation Wireless Standard be the One to Rule Them All?

by Jim Turley

Without science fiction, we’d have no science. After all, somebody had to dream about flying to the moon before somebody else could start working on it. Without the idea of robots, nobody would invent robots. And without imagining what a universal wireless network would be like, we’ll never get one.

We may still never get one, but it won’t be for lack of trying.

Now that 4G wireless has barely rolled out in parts of the world, we’re already working on 5G. And, like the journey of a thousand miles that begins with a single step, the task of creating 5G starts with deciding what the heck it is. And what it isn’t. And what it will do, not do, or do particularly well. Hey, these standards don’t write themselves, you know.


Low Power, Wide Area

A Survey of Longer-Range IoT Wireless Protocols

by Bryon Moyer

If there’s one thing the Internet of Things (IoT) has in abundance, it’s protocols. Some are standards, some are standards-in-progress, and some are proprietary. I’ve done some cursory reviews before, but each survey seems to raise at least as many questions as it answers. We saw that with the deeper dive into messaging protocols; things will be no different with this piece today. Probably worse, actually – in the end, while we’ll cover a lot of issues, it’s somehow unsatisfying.

One of the universal themes in IoT-land is wireless communication. We’ve discussed the basic battle between WiFi, Bluetooth, and Zigbee before, but these are all short-range protocols (meshing aside). There’s also activity afoot with respect to longer range wireless protocols, but with power and cost characteristics intended to make them more attractive for IoT deployments than the current cellular system is.


TI Innovation Challenge Takes Flight

Seven Deadly Synths, Real-time ASL, and Hercules Autopilot

by Amelia Dalton

Gather 'round makers, it’s innovation time! In this week’s Fish Fry, we’re checking out the Texas Instruments Innovation Challenge North America Design Contest with Steve Lyle from TI. Steve introduces us to this year’s super cool winning entries including an advanced new synthesizer that will change how the physically disabled create music, a new wearable that will help the hearing impaired communicate with others, and a full flight control system designed for quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicles that could change how unmanned search and rescue missions are carried out. Also this week, we look into a new IoT product launched by Project Overlord (yes, really).


Mentoring Makers

Community is the Mother of Invention

by Larra Morris

The paper supply place down the block from my apartment may be the happiest retail store in all of Manhattan.

Every time I walk in there, the workers inside brighten and start asking questions: “Oooh! Poster board? What are you going to make?” They want to know all about the project and whether I’ve considered the merits of hot glue over tape. Their enthusiasm is enough to make a person feel a little self-conscious about the rather basic, uninspiring plans they have for their card stock purchase.

These paper enthusiasts, much like the friendly people in a quilt store who would love to hear all about what you’re going to do with those colorful fabric scraps, or an excited Maker Faire veteran checking out each and every booth under the tent, are exemplifying an attitude essential to the maker movement: they view creativity as a team sport.


AMD Gets All Tokyo with Fiji

Twenty-two die in a single package?

by Jim Turley

The semiconductor business is a lot like selling real estate. It’s not the dirt you’re paying for; it’s the location. A square acre in the middle of Manhattan will cost you a lot more than an acre in the desert (provided it’s not in the middle of a Saudi oil field). Likewise, a square millimeter of 28-nanometer silicon can cost a lot or a little, depending on who made it and what they did with it.

To stretch the analogy a bit further, the cost of the real estate also depends on what “improvements” you’ve made to the property. An empty field isn’t worth as much as a developed lot with a four-story apartment building on it (again, assuming your field isn’t atop a gold mine).

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