Rugged IoT and Can You Spot the Difference?

Schematics, Design Challenges, and More

by Amelia Dalton

Are you ready for a challenge? In this week’s Fish Fry, Greg Roberts introduces us to EMA’s Can You Spot the Difference Contest? where you can win a Raspberry Pi 3 by pitting yourself against OrCAD 17.2 in comparing different schematics. Also this week, Matthias Huber (ADLINK) joins Fish Fry to discuss the challenges of designing rugged IoT systems.

 

Toward a Hardware-Agnostic World

HSA Foundation Releases Specification v1.1

by Jim Turley

I think there's something great and generic about goldfish. They're everybody's first pet. – Paul Rudd

It’s finally happened: processors are now completely generic and interchangeable.

Might as well go home, CPU designers. There is no differentiation left to exploit. All of your processor architectures, instruction sets, pipelines, code profiling, register files, clever ALUs, bus interfaces – all of it is now as generic and substitutable as 80’s hair metal bands. Your entire branch of technology has been supplanted by some programmers.

 

The x86 Moat

Can Intel Defend the Data Center?

by Kevin Morris

Fortresses seldom fall on their own accord. Designed by engineers, they typically have the wherewithal to hold off the anticipated attacks. Historically, the most common cause of fortress demise is the unanticipated - a change in the underlying assumptions. When rifled cannon barrels came into existence, for example, the underlying assumption behind most fortress design was broken. Almost overnight, defenses that had been solid and reliable for decades became almost useless for their intended purpose. After a time, ticket booths were installed and they were transformed into relics - museums and monuments to a bygone era.

Intel’s data center fortress is defended by the x86 moat.

 

Security Certifications

High- and Low-Level Assessments

by Bryon Moyer

The Internet of Things (IoT) is still the Wild West. Anyone can wake up some morning and declare a new idea for a sensor, a new protocol, a new product, a new application… pretty much anything – as long as it has “IoT” in the title of the press release.

And that’s great for spawning fresh ideas. But as civilization encroaches on this untamed territory, notions of governance are being suggested for limiting some of the possible excesses. We’ve talked about protocol standards numerous times before, but there are a couple of new, different standard efforts underway that relate not so much to agreement on how to behave, which is the role of protocols, but rather to the quality of the systems. For today’s discussion, the focus is on security.

 

Bridge Over Pixelated Water

CrossLink Changes the Camera Interface Game

by Amelia Dalton

We're talking about the building blocks of electronic design in this week's Fish Fry. First, we take a closer look at some groundbreaking transistor technology. We investigate new research coming out of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology that could finally make graphene tunneling transistors a reality. Also this week, we examine Lattice Semiconductor's CrossLink pASSP with Subra Chandramouli. Subra and I dive down into the details of this new programmable bridging device and reveal how ASSP and the FPGA parts of the CrossLink story can help you with your next camera or interface-enhanced design.

 

Challenging Challenge Questions

Do They Really Provide the Best Security?

by Bryon Moyer

The developed world – particularly the US – is a complex environment replete with residents from diverse places and backgrounds with widely differing experiences. But it’s not a homogeneous mix: cities will be more diverse than rural areas, and, even within cities, you’re going to get clusters of people with shared characteristics.

Well, there appears to be a cluster of people – not sure where – that have the following traits:
• They’ve lived in one place and went to one set of schools.
• They’ve had one set of friends for their entire life.
• They have clear favorites of everything. And those favorites never change, ever. By the time they’re 25, they have a favorite pet, movie, book, teacher, TV show, musician, song, everything. And even though they have 60 years ahead of them, those favorites will stick.


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