Micron’s New NOR Flash Circles Back

From XIP to Serial to XIP All Over Again

by Bryon Moyer

It feels just a little bit like a long arc that may actually be looping back onto its origin. Back to the future. Or perhaps ahead to the past.

Our topic for today is NOR flash memory, the introverted and slightly older twin to the better-known NAND flash that powers all those thumb drives that are spilling out of my drawer. Named for their internal architectures, both memories provide non-volatile storage by means of floating gate charge trapping, but NAND works better for random storage; NOR is more efficient for sequential access.

At least, that’s how the story started.


On the Edge of Tomorrow

IP and the World of IoT Edge Devices

by Amelia Dalton

How do you dream in IoT? Does the Power Bogey Man burn up your diodes? Does process integration lurk in the shadows? Never fear, my engineering compatriots - help is on the way. In this week’s Fish Fry, we delve into the deep dark secrets of IoT IP. My guest Ron Lowman and I discuss how subsystem re-architecture can keep that Power Bogey Man at bay, what design requirements should be tackled first, and how IP may just be the key to sweet IoT dreams after all.


System-wide Collaboration

The Key to Optimizing the Value of Hardware Design and Verification Engineers

by Graham Reith and Jack Erickson, MathWorks

The electronics and semiconductor markets have always been very competitive, and the ongoing consolidation trend has raised the stakes even higher. Additionally, significant investments must be made and requirements set well before the first unit ships. This up-front effort contributes significantly to the electronics value chain, where concepts and algorithms are invented and implemented as hardware or software. The hardware side is especially challenging due to its permanency and per-unit variable cost. The task of the hardware engineering team is to implement those concepts and algorithms in competitive and cost-effective silicon and to exhaustively verify that it will function as intended in every scenario.


CPUs Get Cheaper; Transistors Get More Expensive

Synopsys Keynote Presentation Highlights Some Strange Trends

by Jim Turley

“…but there are also unknown unknowns: the ones we don't know we don't know.” – Donald Rumsfeld

Some things we know; some things we don’t know. And sometimes we haven’t got a clue. That’s pretty much how engineering feels to most of us, I think. We’re pretty good at our little specialties, and we know enough to be dangerous about other aspects of engineering, but we’re mostly clueless about marketing, or finance, or art history, or proper cesta technique in jai alai.

So it’s good to get a reality-slap once in a while. You know, to kind of wake us up and rattle our preconceived notions. Nothing dangerous, mind you. Just a recalibration.


A Tool for Designing Audio Subsystems

Audio Weaver Claims Big Development Savings

by Bryon Moyer

One way of looking at the Internet of Things (IoT) is to think of it as endowing machines with human characteristics – in particular with respect to our ability to sense the world. To some extent, past efforts have served to sense things that we’re not so good at sensing precisely ourselves. Like temperature or pressure or orientation.

That helps humans, who can then combine their own senses with machine senses for better decisions. But if we further enable our machines to do what we can do, then we can have the machines do without us. (I know… not so good for jobs…). So cameras and microphones will replace our eyes and ears, playing an increasingly important role as our ability to process their data improves.


Making Tesla Proud

A Fish Fry Greatest Hit!

by Amelia Dalton

It’s creepy! It’s crawly. It occasionally has scales! It’s Amelia’s Weekly Fish Fry! This week we are celebrating one of the coolest (and one might say, creepiest) scientists, electrical engineers, and visionaries the world has ever seen -- Nikola Tesla. My guest this week is physicist Heidi Baumgartner. She can run a nuclear reactor, she can teach soldering, and most importantly for today’s broadcast, she is one of the founders of OneTesla. Heidi is here to explain exactly how you can build your very own singing Tesla coil, how she became involved with OneTesla, and what it's like to vacation at Chernobyl. Also this week, we check out why 8-bit shouldn’t be thrown out like last year’s Halloween candy.

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register