From the Cradle to the Cloud

Education Meets High Tech

by Amelia Dalton

This week Fish Fry is all about technological innovation in education. From kindergarten to college, from Malaysia to Texas, we look into recent technological advances that aim to even the educational playing field in the United States and across the globe. My first guest is Scott McDonald (Rorke Global Solutions). Scott unveils Rorke’s new digital learning system and discusses with me how Rorke was motivated to break ground on this high tech education revolution. (We also throw in some basketball trash talk.) Keeping with our education theme, Silicon Cloud International CEO Mojy Chian joins Fish Fry to explore the future of cloud computing and how Silicon Cloud International's educational cloud centers hope to create a whole new generation of chip designers.

 

Who Controls the Power?

Open Power Foundation Aims to Make PowerPC More Plentiful

by Jim Turley

Once upon a time, there were many little RISC processors frolicking in the deep green microprocessor forest. There was the jaunty little ARM. The bright little SPARC. The mighty little MIPS. The aristocratic little PowerPC. And so many others. They all played and laughed and had ever such a good time.

Then, one by one, the happy little RISC processors started disappearing. Were they gobbled up by the big, bad CISC processor that lurked in the woods? Did they cross over the Wheatstone Bridge and into another land? Or did they just get lost in the tall grass, wandering aimlessly until their mommies and daddies forgot about them?

 

FPGA-Prototyping Simplified

Cadence Rolls New Protium Platform

by Kevin Morris

System on Chip (SoC) design today is an incredibly complicated collaborative endeavor. By applying the label “System” to the chips we design, we enter a realm of complex, interdisciplinary interactions that span realms like analog, digital, communications, semiconductor process, and - with increasing dominance - software. Since the first SoCs rolled out a mere decade or so ago, the composition of design teams has shifted notably, with the percentage of cubicles occupied by software developers increasing much more rapidly than those of any of the other engineering disciplines. In most SoC projects today, software development is the critical path, and the other components of the project are merely speed bumps in the software development spiral.

 

An Irregular Street Scene

Plasma-Therm Proposes Plasma Dicing

by Bryon Moyer

A silicon wafer will always be patterned with a perfect grid of rectangular dice. It’s so obvious that you even have to think about it. From the very first wafer you saw in school to whatever you’re working with today, they’ve all looked like a well-planned city with edge-to-edge streets.

But did you ever wonder what would happen if you didn’t lay a wafer out that way? Plasma-Therm presented some alternative ideas at the recent MEPTEC MEMS Technology Symposium, suggesting that breaking the rules can have some benefits – although, as always, there are tradeoffs. I should caution that these are largely conceptual ideas that need further vetting, although ON Semiconductor has done some implementation, confirming net benefits for the dice they worked with.

 

Don’t Pass Me By

Project Ara Dev Boards and the Internet of Moving Things

by Amelia Dalton

The pedal is to the metal, our motor is running, and Fish Fry is hitting the open road. At the wheel this week is mCube CEO Ben Lee. Ben and I discuss the future of the IoT market, the details of mCube's super tiny accelerometers, and where you can find a truly unique golf course where you play above the clouds. Also joining our Fish Fryin' caravan this week, is an exciting update from the folks at Google's Project Ara (and you won't want to miss this!) Last but certainly not least, we round out this episode with a little ride down Static Timing and Constraint Validation Lane. Buckle up my friends, it's gonna be a wild ride!

 

Off to the Android Races

New EEMBC Benchmark Measures Android Speed

by Jim Turley

“I don’t always benchmark my Android devices. But when I do, I prefer AndEBench-Pro.” – The Most Boring Man in the World Benchmarking, like economics, is a dismal science. Both are important and both are more complicated than the casual observer may expect. EEMBC is an expert at one of these.

The Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark consortium (the second E is purely decorative) is a nonprofit group approaching its 20th birthday. The merry band of benchmarkers has expanded beyond its original remit of creating tiny benchmark kernels for stressing CPU cores, and it now offers a whole catalog of benchmarks large and small for just about anything. There’s an automotive benchmark, a Web browser benchmark, and now two different Android benchmarks.

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