All Modules All the Time

Microchip Takes LoRa and Motion Detection by Storm

by Amelia Dalton

One of the biggest challenges in IoT communications is distance. In this week’s Fish Fry, we examine a new communications technology called LoRa. Tyler Smith (Microchip Technology) is here to tell us how it can be used, where it is best suited for implementation, and how LoRa could change the future of IoT communications. Also this week, we look into the details of a new motion detection module that packs a big ol’ punch by combining a powerful motion co-processor with 9-axis sensors (including an accelerometer, a magnetometer, and a gyroscope) all in an itty-bitty package.

 

TI MCU Goes 32-Bit

New MSP432 Family is ARM-Based… Of Course

by Jim Turley

Spring is sprung. The grass is riz. I wonder where the chips they is. – Justifiably Anonymous

Springtime means growth. Growth means change. Change means adjusting to new things.

For TI’s perennial MSP430 family of MCUs, today marks the start of a new season. A new branch on the family tree, if you will. For today, the MSP430 grows up – to 32 bits. It has reached that awkward adolescent stage where it has outgrown its toy box but isn’t quite ready for a desk job. It was time for a big change, a growth spurt, and that transition always comes at a price.

 

HLS is the New Black

Cadence Stratus Ushers In a New Era

by Kevin Morris

It’s been more than twenty years since I started working on high-level synthesis (HLS). You might say I’ve studied the topic a lot. For most of those two-plus decades, HLS has been widely considered the “design methodology of the future.” And there are those who have held onto the belief that it always will be.

For those of you not in tune with the terms, high-level synthesis is the automatic creation of hardware architectures from behavioral descriptions. At first, HLS was known as “behavioral synthesis.” But, after some early bad experiences, the EDA industry quietly shifted the name over to HLS - hoping that nobody would notice or have episodes of PTSD when confronted with the idea.

 

A Low-Power Gyro – For Real

Harnessing Slosh

by Bryon Moyer

We (or, at least, most of us) don’t have fancy navigational gadgets in our cars. (Your phone doesn’t count.) We expect the planes we fly on or the ships we sail on to have gyroscopes, but we don’t expect that, in our car, buried deep under the hood somewhere, lurks a classic gimbally sort of contraption madly spinning away and keeping us on the straight and narrow.

But… as you drove in to work today, you may well have been accompanied by a crude gyroscopoid thingy. (No, I’m still not talking about your phone.) In fact, the same item likely served as an accelerometer. In fact, it’s more evident as an accelerometer. If you had to decelerate rapidly, what might detect this? Could it be the coffee that has now been deposited as a thin film all over your windshield and dashboard?

 

32 Flavors of PCB Software

Altium Brings the Goods to Makers, Startups, and Engineers Alike

by Amelia Dalton

Buying PCB software can be a lot like purchasing a new car. Once you've got the full set of amenities that you've always wanted (don't forget the TruCoat!), you're about ready to take out a second mortgage on your house. PCB design software does not have to break the bank or cause ruffled feathers during your next budget review. In this week's Fish Fry, we examine the multiple flavors of Altium's PCB tool suites packages -- all the bells and whistles, price points, and more with Sam Sattel, PCB rockstar from Altium. Also this week, we check out iSkin - the newest research in wearable technology coming out of the Embodied Interaction Group in Germany. You won't want to miss it!

 

Programming Dark Matter

Intel’s MMU is a Handy Tool to Prevent Hacking

by Jim Turley

One of the many charms of the x86 processor architecture is its fantastically complex memory-management unit. First-time programmers fall to their knees, quailing in fear, at the thought of programming a Core i7 chip’s MMU. Grown men cry. Horses weep. Concrete structures crumble.

But like any tool, the MMU can be used for good or for evil. In this case, it’s both at the same time. Security researcher Jacob Torrey, building on the work of many x86 programmers before him, has worked out a way to make x86 code highly hack-resistant by using the on-chip MMU in a fiendishly clever way.

« Previous123456...318Next »

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register