editor's blog
Subscribe Now

Wireless Phone Charging Without the Extra Antennas

Antenna_pic.jpgAbout a year ago, when we were in the wake of numerous wireless power announcements, we discussed a technology called “Cota” from a company called Ossia. The idea was of using very high frequency charging – 2.4 GHz – at low power to keep a constant trickle charge going at distances up to around 30 feet (10 meters) or so.  Effectively, the charger sends out RF signals and the phone harvests them. Meaning that your phone could charge unbeknownst to you while still in your pocket – no need to take it out and put it on some pad.

But of course, there’s always a “but.” And, in this case, it was the antenna: as in, you needed one for this. Actually, you needed more than one, since they use a phased approach. In addition to the antennas that are already in your phone. A clear real-estate challenge.

Well, this year, they just announced that they can now leverage the existing WiFi and Bluetooth antennas that are already in the phone. There are some required circuit and firmware changes, but they claim no additional components. In fact, they say that this approach can actually save space: in a world with lots of Cota chargers, you could make do with a smaller battery, since it would be frequently topped up as you moved around town.

You can learn more in their announcement.

Leave a Reply

featured blogs
Jul 17, 2018
As I mentioned last week in my blog about narrowband IoT , 4G is the standard that is used across the radio interface of most of the connected phones in the world. 4G is the fourth generation of this standard (and LTE is kind of like Rev2 of 4G), mostly dealing with the speed...
Jul 16, 2018
Each instance of an Achronix Speedcore eFPGA in your ASIC or SoC design must be configured after the system powers up because Speedcore eFPGAs employ nonvolatile SRAM technology to store the eFPGA'€™s configuration bits. Each Speedcore instance contains its own FPGA configu...
Jul 12, 2018
A single failure of a machine due to heat can bring down an entire assembly line to halt. At the printed circuit board level, we designers need to provide the most robust solutions to keep the wheels...