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A Standard for Standards

Ever wanted to create your own embedded-sysems standard? If you’ve spent any time at all participating in standard-setting organization’s meetings, you know that’s going to be a tough chore. The process is slow, the players have conflicting agendas, and the process can be tedious.

But there’s a new group here to help. The Standards Group for Embedded TEchnologies (SGET, www.sget.org) is a sort of meta-group of embedded companies that work together to submit their proposals to the larger standards bodies. By joining SGET, you get the might of the larger group behind you, as well as their help in polishing and submitting your proposals. It’s a bit like hiring a lawyer to help with your patent application. Except not as expensive.

What kind of standards do SGET members work on? All kinds: bus interfaces, board form factors, software APIs, you name it. SGET also helps promote the standards its members creaete, including links with publishers that can produce your definition books.

Joining SGET is easy. All it takes is 900 Euros per year. And a willingness to see things actually get done.

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